« BOHICA! - TTG | Main | The Plot Against Pope Francis »

07 October 2019

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Diana C

I keep as informed--using this site as a great source as well as other--about the world situation. I became disillusioned with the neocon thinking about what our role should be in regard to foreign problems. We have spent so much in money, but sadly as much in the death and maiming and psychological strain in our young fighters.

That said, I have no idea myself about what we should be doing.

What I wish is that our young men (and women) could be devoting themselves to fixing some things in our own country. We have to do much in regard to improving our highways and roads, to fixing our bridges and rebuilding our great cities that are have problems with horrible slums and homelessness, gangs and drugs.

I like that Trump has tried to put emphasis on protecting our borders and on keeping bad actors out of our country. I don't think he is doing that with any real racist bias, as the left assumes.

I know we need allies in this world; and I don't deny that there are groups who view our country as the source of all that is wrong in the world. But I would rather fight those people by keeping them away from our country and by working to make the civil discourse less divided and working together for making our country a more comfortable place to to live.

And wouldn't it be great to spend far more in projects now to build the Space Force?

I will admit it IF I see that what Trump has done by making this decision was wrong.

However, as a retired high school, community college, and college teacher, I remember so many young men in my classes who did not finish their courses and went off to the military--and possibly to the ME. I am sure many came back and were stronger for having gone to serve in the military, but many also came back physically and psychologically damaged.

Sometimes it's good to take a break and re-think our goals and the way to achieve them.

JJackson

I thought the Kurds made up the bulk of the SDF forces which enforce order in all the areas E of the river. Raqqah and much else is predominately arab and not necessarily US friendly. Which leaves the SDF's arab component's loyalty, in light of recent events, an important factor. The actual US personal numbers are a small part of the SDF and heavily skewed to artillery & SF.
pl - or anyone else.
Is that about right, or have I misunderstood some part of whatever is going on?

John_Frank

In case people have forgotten, the President made the decision to withdraw US forces from Syria last September.

He reiterated that position last night by way of a press release, earlier today on twitter, then again during a Q & A after the signing of two trade agreements this afternoon and following brief remarks to the press while meeting with the Secretary of Defense, the Chair of Joint Chiefs and other senior military officials.

The withdrawal has been taking place over a period of time. Since last night's announcement, 50 US special forces were withdrawn from the border area, but remain in Syria. At the same time, the Coalition supplied more military aid to the SDF.

For additional details read the following thread by .@mutludc starting with this tweet:

https://twitter.com/mutludc/status/1181377732103589888

Will Turkish forces actually invade northern Syria? Maybe, although State and Defense continue to reiterate to the Turks that such an invasion would be a mistake.

As the President made clear, and reiterated by spokespeople for the Defense and State Departments, the US will not provide any support to Turkey should they invade; and if the Turkish forces do step out of line, the President has stated the US will impose sanctions which will destroy the Turkish economy.

Unhinged Citizen

What is the concern with the ISIS prisoners? Why not just solve the issue by pulverizing the carcasses with high explosive howitzer shells?

Morally speaking, there is of course no concern with the destruction of this pathological strain of creatures, as it was their publicly manifested desire.

You can't be accused of committing war crimes if there are no remains...

John_Frank

After the signing of the US - Japan Trade Agreement and the US - Japan Digital Trade Agreement, the President answered questions from the media, during the course of which the topic of Syria came up. Worth reading his answers:

Remarks by President Trump at Signing of the U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement and U.S.-Japan Digital Trade Agreement
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-signing-u-s-japan-trade-agreement-u-s-japan-digital-trade-agreement/

Also, following his public briefing with the military leaders, the President answered a few questions. The topic of the Syria came up. Again worth reading his answers.

Remarks by President Trump in Briefing with Military Leaders
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-briefing-military-leaders/

Stephanie

The Kurds? Turning U.S. troops into prison guards? We're in "We came, we saw, he died--giggle giggle," la la land.

Drain the swamp: McConnell, Rubio, Graham, Romney... Trump sees they are going to stab him in the back on impeachment, so he doesn't need them anymore. Not a single person in the Republican establishment helped him get the nomination.

Now, if he would only kick Brutus Pence off the ticket and replace him with Tulsi, he'll win a second term. And that is coming from someone who would never vote for him in a million years.

johnf

Two or three weeks ago I partly attributed the lessening of tension in the Iran/Saudi stand off to the seeming paralysis of the Israeli state with their hung elections.

Netanyahu, the lynch pin of Middle Eastern turmoil, is fighting for his life and to stay out of jail. I have read descriptions of him being an exhausted shadow of his former self.

Now this move out of Syria and a slap in the face for the neocons and Israeli-firsters in Washington.

When the cats away the mice do play.

johnf

This would be very bad optics for the Kurds among a certain crowd.

But the world seems to be trying on a new pair of glasses.

johnf

It would be interesting to hear from the experts on this site on who they think is running Israel at the moment.

Probably not the politicians. Would it be the intelligence services and military? Aren't they considered to be more cautious and "realist" than the politicians?

Cee

Let us pray.

The Jerusalem Post is interesting reading now.

Procopius

I could swear I saw a post here that included news that the Kurds had contacted Damascus and were discussing alliance as part of Syria with some limited autonomy. I don't know what happened to those talks, if they ever occurred. I have no idea if the Turks would be willing to attack SAA troops as well as Kurds, but I don't think Assad is going to be happy with Turkey taking a swath of Syrian territory along their border.

CK

Moving 20 men a few miles down the road sure does expose who are the friends of the USA and who its enemies.
Also shows who the President can trust and who he can't(Graham).
The Israeli press and the Israel firsters in the US govt and media are screaming betrayal. The Russians and the Syrians have so far said nada.
The Kurds are just being the Kurds always ready to sell out to the next higher bidder. Been this way since the beginning of recorded history won't change in the foreseeable future.
I expect that Russian and Syrian diplomacy will eventuate in a solution acceptable to all but the Israeli and American Neo-cons.

d74

" suppress an increasingly restive Arab population"

Your sources? What's origin? Who? When? Examples?

All ethnies in North-East Syria (more than Rojava. 1/5 of Syria) are exclude from talks about new constitution but compromises are likely.

Babak Makkinejad

Col. Lang

Do Puritan have a transactional view of human interactions and relations?

Fred

Stephanie,

So we get rid of the Republicans and leave Pelosi, Schumer and Schiff and company in place?

Procopius

Sanctions seem to work pretty well at imposing suffering on the lower economic strata of a country's population. They don't seem to have much success at changing the behavior of targeted governments. I have no understanding of why they are so beloved of the neocons. Kind of gradually escalating bombing campaigns. The sanctions against Iran seem to be creating a more powerful alliance between Russia and China, which is supporting Iran and creating an alternative financial channel. So I don't really think imposing further sanctions on Turkey will have the effect Trump hopes for. The last few years Erdogan has gone to Moscow several times a year, and Putin has gone to Ankara. You never see mention of this in the American MSM, though. Same with Netanyahu's several trips a year to Moscow. There's a lot of dealing going on that Americans never hear about.

Leith

I share your enthusiasm for Tulsi. But a Trump/Tulsi ticket will never happen. She called him despicable when he sent troops to Saudi Arabia. And reportedly she now supports his impeachment.

fredw

Yes, it would create terrible optics. But the benefits of good optics seem to have expired. This is about the only leverage that I can see for the Kurds. I have no idea how practical it would be. That is why I asked the question. But I don't see much benefit to the Kurds from letting Turkey have those guys. Or from exhibiting any great concern over their fate in Assad's hands.

Terence Gore

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=YbXfsaJ8krw

John tees it up for Tulsi, and gives her the wind speed, direction, and relative humidity.

I still liked it

Vig

exeunt?

where are they going?

https://tinyurl.com/faustus-economy-stupid

turcopolier

Babak

Recommend to you the book "Albion's Seed" for information on Puritan folkways.

Linda

My mouth is still agape. With “we can’t be accused of war crimes if there are no remains”, but I’ll move on from there. Erdogan has said that he wants to restore the glory of the Ottoman Empire and announced yesterday that he will send two million refugees back to Syria. Also I cannot see how ISIS prisoners will not have the opportunity to bleed back into the population. So I can’t imagine the US allowing Turkey to occupy a piece of Syria is a good thing.

David Habakkuk

Babak Makkinejad,

I have, unfortunately, not read ‘Albion’s Seed’, but looking at the ‘Wikipedia’ entry, the basic argument sounds extremely plausible.

I am slightly concerned at the apparent description of the Welsh and even more the Scots as ‘satellite’ peoples – particularly given that the British Empire was to a substantial extent run by the latter.

You might also usefully read an introduction which the historian C. Vann Woodward wrote in 1959 to a republication of George Fitzhugh’s 1857 polemic ‘Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters.’

(See http://www.ditext.com/woodward/fitzhugh.html .)

There are parts of Peter Laslett’s account of the roots of the ideas of the royalist polemicist Sir Robert Filmer in the sociological reality of the society of the gentry of Kent, on which Vann Woodward relies, which may need to be revised in the light of subsequent scholarship.

But the basic point that Laslett makes, that this society replicated itself in Virginia – a world created by younger sons, one might say – I think stands.

When I read the first novel in our host’s Civil War trilogy, I was forcibly reminded of Vann Woodward’s argument.

But, matters get even more complex.

Among the few British films which I think are works of genius are some of those which resulted from the collaboration of Michael Powell – who was actually a gentleman of Kent – and Emeric Pressburger, an Hungarian Jewish refugee.

These include two classic treatments of British military cultures, in both of which the ‘male lead’ is played by the great Roger Livesey.

The 1943 film ‘The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp’ is a complex reflection on ends and means in warfare.

Although produced in the middle of the war, it is also the story of a friendship between an Englishman and a German.

In the 1945 film ‘I Know Where I’m Going’, ironically, we see a portrayal of a Scots society which is still recognisably similar to the society of the Kentish gentry.

So the character Livesey plays, a Royal Navy officer on leave, is at once very ‘modern’ – industrial war was a central concern of the Navy, much more than the Army – and also a Scottish laird.

JerseyJeffersonian

I think that you forget that, after the Turkish shoot-down (ambush, actually) of a Russian warplane, Russia imposed strong sanctions. This got results double quick.

Sbin

Trump's handlers already walking back his policy.
By next week a few troops will be moved around and convoys of arms and munitions will be headed that way.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

My Photo

September 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      
Blog powered by Typepad