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19 September 2019

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CK

Some number smaller than 0.

Fred

Tidewater,

"At the battle of the Teutoburg..."

Arminius was a Roman ally with years of experience serving the legions. His betrayal was completely unexpected by Varus.

Tidewater

Arminius was a Roman knight! That's why this is such a fascinating story. At the moment I am relying strictly on Wikipedia. Arminius-Wikipedia. or: https://en.wikipedia.org>wiki>Arminius

Tidewater

She's also a Zionist pawn.

Tidewater

"What is not agreed upon is the measure of human contribution to this astronomically-driven process."

Please see: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. August 15, 2019. Article by Dana Nuccitelli. 'Millions of times later, 97 per cent climate consensus still faces denial.'

https://thebulletin.org/2019/08/millions-of-times-later

Tidewater

Sir,

I didn't intend any institutional propaganda. Back in the seventies I once heard a speculative discussion among some young naval academy officers about the harm the academy training could have done to them. It was explained to me that they felt that the confidence in themselves in going forward with decisive, aggressive leadership action in a difficult situation had been perhaps somewhat curtailed. Actually, I did think that there would be some military courses such as map reading at West Point. And it's true, there is some kind of mystique about West Point. But that was sloppy writing on my part. I could just have sketched in rapidly what we can surmise about the career of Arminius.
From being the hostage son of a German chief to a brilliant career in the Roman army, which must have begun when he was barely in his teens, he first earned Roman citizenship, then became a Knight, served with distinction in Illyricum--hmmm, Bosnia (interesting the trouble that has come out of the Balkans)--and then at 26 or so, was sent back to Germania as a field grade Roman officer. At 27, he destroyed three Roman legions, some 18,000 soldiers. The Emperor Augustus was alleged to have been seen beating his head against a marble wall, shouting: "Give me back my legions!" I suspect that any true Empire relishes its defeats as well as its victories, since it assumes it will win in the end.

By the way, I just reread Hemingway's 'Across the River and Into the Trees'. That is a very fine book. That opening in the Torcello marshes Did you know that the protagonist of that novel, Colonel Cantwell, went to VMI?

Tidewater

Have you heard of a book by Mike Davis called 'Planet of Slums'?

Tidewater

There was a time when I did pay some attention to James Lovelock. I have not read his books, but I looked at his blog. He was one of the first scientists to speak out back in 1970. Do you know the entertaining story about how he detected chlorofluorocarbon off his vacation home in western Ireland? Google-- 'The Tip of the Iceberg.'

https://undsci.berkeley.edu>article>ozone-depletion-02

Tidewater

I've read about this over the years and double-checked what the latest poop is. If you mean that the Fouga pilot who shot down the DC-6 was Jan Van Risseghem, then that is not correct. Van Risseghem had been arrested on 28 August, 1961, at Elisabethville, and repatriated from Kamina to Brussels on 7 September, 1961.

This did not end Van Risseghem's employment as a mercenary by the Katanga Government of Moise Tshombe. Two separate government agencies found that he was still in Belgium on September 16. As I seem to recall from a quick reading (on Sunday!) of the UN report, Van Risseghem signed a document on Sept 16 in a bank in Brussels which was related to having his salary from the Tshombe government either paid out in future upon request to someone else, perhaps an allotment to a family member, or was simply to get him some travel cash. This may have been signed on September 17, by one account; but certainly was signed in Brussels on the 16th. The UN plane was shot down on the night of the September 17,1961. Van Risseghem was thought to have left Brussels on the 16th--but it is not known whether he then went to Paris for a flight back to Katanga or not. Nevertheless, he was in transit.

The UN report on the investigation that began in 2015 and was signed off on, in 2017, by M.C. Othman, Chief Justice of Tanzania, concluded that Van Risseghem did not have time to get back to Africa to be the pilot who made any suspected attack--an attack that remains unproven -- on the UN secretary general's plane at Ndola. He was excluded as a suspect.

This makes me happy, by the way. We knew some RAF Jolly boat sailors, we raced against at Langley, Va., and later I knew some retirees in Spain, and they are, famously, totally cool guys. And it is interesting that official information has Van Risseghem reporting back in for duty on the 20 of September.

Tidewater

I don't understand that.

Babak Makkinejad

Tidewater

I am then a dissenter with the climate consensus.

CK

You asked: "How many million auslanders will be allowed in to the Diocletian civilization? Or rather, how many CAN be allowed in?"
I gave a mathematical reply.

Barbara Ann

Yes, the instrument he made was able to detect CFC's in concentrations of parts per trillion IIRC. I would recommend the original Gaia as an introduction to his theory of the climate being regulated by and for life (the biota).

I confess to being a big fan and I think history will recognize Lovelock as a great thinker. Like all great scientists he upset a lot of the scientific establishment with his heresy. He deserves a Nobel prize, but of course the whole point of his ground-breaking idea is that it cuts across multiple siloed disciplines. He recently publish a book on the dangers of AI and is still going strong at 100.

Tidewater

Thanks. I have gone off in too many directions.

Interesting, if you think about it, that the peoples of North Africa have the same problem. How many immigrants, displaced persons from the Middle-East and western Asia, how many black African people of the sub-Sahara, can Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Morocco, be expected to take care of, deal with or absorb without becoming destabilized? Will there have to be large holding camps? Bases again? Will the frontier line have to be drawn across the Sahel, much deeper into Africa, well away from the civilizations of the Mediterranean Coast? It already looks like an emergency. One of the great questions of our time, but one that could also be mooted if there is a blue ocean event(BOE) in the Arctic.

Keith Harbaugh

Definitely worth noting that the Washington Nationals baseball team advanced beyond the first round of the Major League Baseball playoffs FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER! (link)
Their previous four trips to the playoffs (2012, 2014, 2016, 2017) ended in the first round, the National League Division Series. (link)
The fifth time was a charm :-)

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