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01 March 2018

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Sid Finster

http://www.epsilontheory.com/good-job/

Forgive the digression, but the subject seems to be one near and dear to the Colonel's heart.

turcopolier

sid_finster

All dogs go to heaven. People on the other hand ... pl

Lars

They let me too on to their Facebook page and there is an amazing group of adventurers involved in this race and others. I spent 18 years in SE Florida, some of it on the local waters and it has its challenges. It appears the weather will be better this year, even if a little cooler than it has been.

I will enjoy following their progress.

Fred

TTG,

Just get SWMBO a week at Siesta Key and she can take the catboat from Ft. Myer's to Key West to meet up where you two can do a little victory celebration at the Southernmost Pt.

Sid Finster

"I have been studying the traits and dispositions of the "lower animals" (so called) and contrasting them with the traits and dispositions of man. I find the result humiliating to me." - Mark Twain

Account Deleted

TTG

Having done one of these sort of events a couple of times myself, all I can say is JFDI. Plenty of time for the shire later and if there isn't - at least you did it. Look forward to your write up of the 2019 event here next year.

The Twisted Genius

Just a quick note since the windstorm took out our power yesterday. Even the cell phone towers are dark. Luckily, it's not too cold nor too hot. Couldn't have happened at a better time. SWMBO and I are having a hot meal at a very crowded local Bob Evans. They have public WiFi now.

Looks like they left the beach at Fort DeSoto at 9:00AM with a one hour weather delay. I'll try to catch up with them when we get power again.

turcopolier

TTG

You need a generator. pl

Mark Logan

TTG,

Just spitballing, but the desire to incorporate some leg in the propulsion immediately made me think of sliding seat sculls. You really do use a heck of a lot more leg than arm when rowing one of those, and Whitehall has a great base I would be surprised if one could not find a way to stick a Laser rig into one.

http://www.whitehallrow.com/solo-14-slide-seat-sculling-whitehall-rowboat/

The Twisted Genius

pl,

Jubilation! We have power. SWMBO admonishes me about getting a generator every time we lose power. We have one up at the house in Saratoga, a whole house, automatic kick in, natural gas powered system. We were glad we had it during a snowstorm one year. I'll probably break down this summer and get a portable generator just to power the refrigerator, a few lights and either a space heater or room air conditioner depending on the season.

I spent part of last night reading by candle lantern (Yankee and Wooden Boat magazines). No sound except for the wind in the trees. All that was missing was a small wood stove. That would have been a lot better than a generator blattering away out in the driveway. At least now I can follow those oddballs sailing through the alligators, pythons and sharks and enjoy the camaraderie of SST.

The Twisted Genius

Mark Logan,

The Angus Rowcruiser (teamkairos) has a sliding seat rowing rig. I think this may be the first such rig in this challenge. CLC also has a drop in rig that's been used in several of their designs including their version of a Whitehall.

Mark Logan

TTG,

It almost appears the event was designed around the Angus line of boats!

I think one of their proa/ama configurations would be a must for 300 miles. Anything like a pure 'yak and one would be glued to the seat the whole way, and with a wet butt that would get ugly. I like their double rig/big amas set up the best.

That double proa set up in your post will likely be draggy as heck to turn, Single proa might be better, as most Indo boats are. Be interesting to see how that pans out.

JPB

TTG -

I believe I saw a few of those fat-bottomed Scamp boats, or something very like them, at the Douarnenez Wooden Boat Festival in Brittany.

http://ports.bretagne.bzh/upload/docs/image/jpeg/2016-07/temps_fete_2026_b_stichelbaut.jpg.associated/th-800x450-temps_fete_2026_b_stichelbaut.jpg.jpg

It's in July every other year. Lots of classic sardine boats. Many built or rebuilt with government historical grants. Wooden racing yachts too, across Biscay Bay down to Portugal. But I'm more of a fan of the working boats.

The Twisted Genius

Mark Logan,

I think this race started with more kayaks in mind, especially with the "inside passage" route through the Everglades that will earn you an alligator tooth. On the sail side, the trend has been towards the cats and tris and more carbon fiber. They are fast. I remember the first time I saw a Hobie 16 cat with a rainbow hued sail at Waikiki in the late 70s. I was in awe how it shot forward in the slightest puff of a breeze. In the same way, last year's Americas Cup races caught my interest. Those boats are carbon fiber hydrofoil cats with wings rather than sails. A good part of the crew are busy keeping hydraulic pressure up rather than sailing the craft. That's exhilarating to watch, but it's not for me. I like wood and canvas be it canoe or sailboat.

That Indonesian double outrigger does look like it would have a hard time in rougher water, but I'm not in a position to doubt the age-old design of a race of seafarers. Perhaps the thinness of the bamboo amas allows them to cut through the water. The boat seems to be doing okay. I'm looking forward to seeing film of that boat in heavier water.

The Twisted Genius

JPB,

I think such stocky little craft are common around England, Scotland and Brittany. I'm pretty sure they had an influence on the design of SCAMP. It reminds me of a VW Bug. So ugly, it's endearing. I love both the Bug and the SCAMP. And I also share your love of those heavily built working boats.

Mark Logan

Only mentioned because every Indo beach fishing boat I saw was single outrigger. I do not doubt there are some doubles but probably only in the very large ones.

I'm a canoe guy myself. More the kevlar ones though. Light is good, and we used to carry "Mach 2" tape just in case, a thin aluminum tape with a bomb-proof adhesive which was available from Boeing surplus quite cheap. Kayaks are fun but it's impossible to carry a descent camp set up in one, and any trip deserves an overnight stop. The structure of weekends!


I was also a skiff guy when it came to sailing. I14's mostly, as I built my own, and am heavy enough to single-hand it if need be. All but certainly if I were doing this I would be using one. Multihulls sometimes, including some Hobies, so yes, I am a speed addict, but the one constant I came to accept is the definition of sailboat racing: "Two boats that can see each other."

The Twisted Genius

Mark Logan,

Built your own International 14. That's damned impressive. I think you and Walrus might have a lot in common. He built an i550 with his son. Your boat building and sailing skills, like those of Walrus, are far beyond mine.

Mark Logan

TTG,

Wish I could say I was in Walrus's class, but in fact it wasn't a big challenge. When Bieker started in the class he copied the Uffa Fox Mark 1, and built a jig for cold molding. When he moved on to his own designs he sold the jig, which was passed around between three of us locals, so I and they had help and I had a store of accumulated wisdom to draw from when it came around to me. Without that jig? Fuggetaboudit.

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