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30 November 2017

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Richardstevenhack

On this side of the water, my prediction that Tillerson would be gone by end of year appears to be coming true.

Reports say Trump is going to throw Tillerson under the bus - like all his other supporters - and replace him with CIA's Mike Pompeo. Senator Cotter - a torture and drone advocate - will replace Pompeo at CIA.

So now we'll have a CIA head in charge at State. I'm totally sure that will improve US diplomacy with North Korea, Russia, China, etc...

Those people who kept saying Trump had some master plan to save us were right - it entails throwing out anyone NOT advocating war with most of the nuclear powers on the planet.

Kooshy

Zizi controlled US media, like the NYT and CNN really want Rex Tillerson out, they are paving the way for him to leave, and have decided who they like to replace him, both candidates for the state and CIA are supper neocon protectors of Zionism in US, and totally anti Iran.

Fred

Richardstevenhack,

This is the second, or perhaps third, report of Tillerson getting "thrown under the bus". I would say the borg are having thieir policy narrative systematicly destroyed by Trump and they are desperate to at least create, or at least maintain, an immage of turmoil in the exectutive branch.

JamesT

Richardstevenhack

Do you think that POTUS ordered CENTCOM to cut off arms supplies to the Kurds in order to start a war with nuclear powers? It seems to me this action does the complete opposite of that - it dramatically reduces the chance of war with Russia.

Patrick Armstrong

One of the great things about this site is that when someone makes a nonsense comment you don't have to do anything to refute it -- plenty of others will.

DemiJohn

Agreed. And Reuters is also In the band.
It would be sad to see one of the last brains in the cabinet disappear.

Bandit

And your are referring to.....which nonsense comment?

Charles Michael

Yes Sir,
I would add that here the ''silent majority'' don't have then to debuke nonsense but enjoy their fellow followers clearheaded reactions.

And many thanks for your reviews, have to dig on the links now.

Yeah, Right

"Those people who kept saying Trump had some master plan to save us were right"

Maybe not a master plan, but Trump may well be marching to a tune that you can not hear.

Take his refusal to certify the JCPOA as stipulated by Congress.

Q: Did he follow that up by tearing up the JCPOA?
A: No, he didn't. He threw the problem back to Congress, who look like a deer caught in some headlights.

He is also expected (either this time or the next) to refuse to sign the waiver regarding moving the US Embassy to Jerusalem.

Q: Will he then follow up by actually, you know, moving that embassy?
A: My guess is he won't, and he'll dare Congress to make something of it.

I really think that there is a pattern to his behaviour, and it isn't the behaviour of a slave to "the establishment".

It looks more like he is throwing that establishment off-balance by saying, in essence, that he isn't interested in playing their silly games, and by doing so he exposes those games as.... silly.

Certifying the JCPOA is a burden, and he simply shrugs it off.
Waiving the Embassy move is a burden, and he'll just shrug it off.

Every time he does so he exposes Congressional politicking that are an irrelevance - an instance of Congress sticking its nose where it doesn't belong - and that's no bad thing.

Just my take, but I really don't think Trump is who you think he is.

Peter AU

I shall have to start posting on how right I have always been. That will allow me to purchase extra large hat and condoms.

English Outsider


Thank you for your valuable summary. Another part of the Colonel's site that makes SST the place, I think the only place, where it's all put together.

On corruption in Russia - it seems to be very bad. Not as bad as Southern Europe maybe, but not pretty.

A difficult subject to examine. But I remember a while ago talking to a contractor who'd done work in Saudi. He said that working over there was a real breath of fresh air. You paid the money over - there seemed to be some sort of informal tariff - and that was it. You knew where you were.

Different here, he said. It was all back door and getting to know the right people to swap favours with. You could never tell whether you'd pressed the right buttons or not, not for certain. More work and no cheaper, when you looked at it in the round.

Corruption at the bottom level here is as far as I know non-existent, not for the man in the street. I've never heard of anyone getting off a motoring offence, for example, by making sure there is money for the policeman tucked into his documents before he sets off, though there are many places abroad where that's a sensible precaution. And bribing the professor to upgrade your degree would be unthinkable here, though not in Italy. I'd be very surprised too if there were suitcases full of cash floating around in more elevated circles. Not for us the breezy free-for-all in Ireland, where a businessman can give a Taoiseach a cheque for a million on the golf course and it's such an everyday transaction that the Taoiseach can say later that yes, it did happen, but he'd never really noticed.

It doesn't happen here because it doesn't need to happen. There are plenty of legal ways of getting money or favours across so a suitcase merchant would be regarded, I think, as a blundering amateur. The amateurs - the MP trying to cash in by taking money for asking questions in the House and such like - get regularly exposed in the press. The people who know what they're about, never. Nothing to expose. It's all legal.

In my view the fact that we've institutionalised our corruption doesn't entitle us to point the finger. It does seem that there is a deplorable amount of straight bribery and corruption in Russia. But we're not the pot that can call that kettle black.

Patrick Armstrong

Give this site a read and see what you think
http://dystopiausa.com/storm-week-7-lay-siege-mammon-sticky-post/

Matthew

Fred: It's assuming that the "professional diplomats" who gave us the Iraq War and the Maiden Demonstrations in Ukraine call Trump irresponsible!

I think Trump is doing a Gulfies. Besides the Mother of Arms Deals with the Kingdom of Horrors, he's just got Bahrain to buy another batch of F-16's they don't need.

Trump said he was going to make the Gulfies pay for our protection. And that is what he is doing.

Now if he could only make the Zionists pay.....

Patrick Armstrong

I agree "institutionalised corruption" is what we have a lot of in the West -- it's not illegal, but it sure looks like passing money to get something from someone in power or transforming public money into private money. I don't see anything like that in Russia (although there was a great deal of it in the 1990s and the perpetrators have been allowed to keep their loot. As long as they keep out of politics).

Matthew

PA: Another great post.

Any idea how this media registration issue will play out? Will the Western media all start reporting from Riga (about Russia) like the Western correspondents report from Jerusalem (about the Arab World)?

Matthew

"doing a bust-out on the Gulfies."

Patrick Armstrong

Report from Riga? oh har har: they already report from an imaginary planet far, far away from Russia.

SmoothieX12

Will the Western media all start reporting from Riga (about Russia) like the Western correspondents report from Jerusalem (about the Arab World)?

They couldn't do it honestly and right when they were in Moscow and, literally, inside Russia's political kitchen, changing a venue wouldn't make any difference in propaganda output. Whitman Bassow left a rather excellent diagnosis of US media in late 1980s. It still stands. Here is a quote: "Thirty years ago as UP correspondent, I met a middle-aged Florida couple in Metropole dining room who were astonished that the average Russian seemed so well dressed. "Why," exclaimed the woman, "they even wear fur hats!" The American scolded me for not reporting such important news. I countered that I frequently wrote features on women's styles, clothes, and shopping in Moscow but that not a single editor on the thousands of newspapers served by the agency would print a story, if I did write one, that a quarter million Russians walked down Gorky Street today wearing shoes. Americans, I said, should have learned in high school, not from the pages of their local newspaper, that Russians wear coats and hats."

Beige Barbaria

Chirac had been for decades a very corrupt politician in France - in the illegal manner that you describe - but was completely acceptable to the Western Fortress.

The Olympians of the Western Fortress have taken excellent causes such as Human Rights, International Security, Representative Government, Rule-of-Law, and Good Government and turned them into wedges against their enemies; thus gutting them from all their moral purport.

None of that is any longer worth getting excited about except International Security as it touches upon continued existence of Human Life on this planet.

Beige Barbaria

In regards to JCPOA, in January of 2018, he will have to make a real decision and can no longer punt.

We shall see.

So far, he has not brought any jobs back into US although he has slowed down the hemorrhaging.

Annem

I would add to the latest Trump announcements but not actually doing it that statement immediately twisted by the Turks to mean that the US had just ordered a halt to arms shipments to the Kurds. Yeah, sure, in the midst of the stand-off with the SAA and wrap-up in Raqqa! Trump made a seemingly vague comment to Erdogan that could give the Turkish dictator "shade" of "face" but the Turks ruined it by exaggerating it, forcing the USG to clarify. Or more likely, the Turks did not twist anything, but the Administration was forced to do clean up work after Trump said something off the wall. POTUS will have even tougher time getting MATTIS&Co. out of the 13 bases in Syria they now supposedly occupy. These are supposedly meant to be a bargaining chip so that the US gets what it wants out of the Geneva process, whatever that may be at the time.

All this is happening as Erdogan is going crazy about the testimony being given by Zarrab in the New York trial about Iran sanctions evasions. His response so far has been that Turkey follows its own national interests and did not do anything illegal according to its own laws. If Flynn tells all, the proposed caper to kidnap Gulen from Pa. and ship him to Turkey and other, as yet unknown grand schemes, may come to light. Not that any of it will cause Erdogan to lose support among his true believers but could make it hard for him to repeat his fraudulent razer-thin majority in the 2019 presidential election that will add legality to his sultanic rule.

In the end, an internationally recognized Syria settlement will have to resolve the seemingly unbridgeable positions: the opposition says that Assad goes and will play no role in deciding the country's future or discussions about it and the reality that any "opposition" led government would likely deprive Russia of its only Mediterranean base, an intolerable loss. If it comes to elections, it is likely that all expat Syrian citizens who have not renounced their citizenship, refugee or otherwise will be allowed to voter, not just those now in surrounding countries. That means a couple of generations worth of families who fled at one time or another from the Baathist regime.

Amir

Do you recon that This would increase the chances of Assad getting reelected? This might feel counterintuitive to you but you should just look at the Iranian diaspora’s different generations and the successive waves of Cubans in Florida. Each of the generations down the line seem to be even more pragmatic and are more sympathetic to a rational approach as opposed to a Neo-Con line of defending Israel to the last Gentile.

BillWade

send those jobless folks here to SW Florida, we desperately need help. I'm not joking - we are hurting for workers.

Grazhdanochka

Another aspect of Corruption is that Day to Day Corruption (Say paying local DPS for a 'Immediate Fine') can be seen by many as a Humanising of Bureaucracy in some cases - looting Public Money for a Bridge or Hospital not so much...

I am not operating a Business myself so I do not encounter those hurdles Personally but each Year I pay about one 'Fee' we can say. This may be for some minor Traffic Infringement that may otherwise for a moments fault or at Times maybe zealous Policing... Encountering someone Face to Face however who may not be exactly well paid and has not always pleasant Job while you drive a new Car reminds me of the differences in Society, the feelings some will have of how unjust is Divisions Economically, Socially - there is a Human Face to much of this Day to Day Corruption and in honesty if I am not being shaken down I do not mind it so much as the rampant theft by Faceless Bureaucrats.

Whilst coming with Problems of its own some would thus argue on this Level Corruption *can* somewhat eliminate some of the Red Tape that one may Encounter making relatively innocent Problems into Nightmares. Of course however this can be slippery Slope and potentially only encourages more and more abuse of Power.

To the positive side of this - I notice this Issue less and less over the Years.. Indeed recent Police Reforms in Russia while not perfect have resulted in some serious Improvements overall. I notice less Apathy from Officers I encounter, more efforts at Public Relations and the last Traffic Infringement I had the Officer was happy to pose in a Picture with me as his first 'Happy Customer'

https://pp.userapi.com/c834102/v834102872/4001a/ESLuch1Ik2c.jpg
(He did everything by the Book and I paid my Fine)..

This of course is just one Anecdotal Perspective, but I do see positive Improvements in most all regards. Recent Firings/Charges have increased for Corruption and for ever decreasing Quantities of Money.... This to me is a fair Indication of how things have moved.

Yeah, Right

It seems a masterly statement of the very obvious.

The USA has been through a period of robber barons and institutionalized graft and corruption in the 19th century.

How did that end?

Was it a slow and steady cleanup, or do did someone who managed to gain a place of power just decide go to work with a big broom?


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