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12 September 2017

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mike

Colonel -

Greater Kurdistan? Yes, definitely an Israeli project. It will never happen. But are the Israelis serious about such a project? Or are they just throwing scheiss at the wall, causing hate and discontent, and hoping they can con us once again into fighting for them.

Douglas was hated by the right. But how can anyone who defended small businessmen and small ranchers and farmers be seen as a leftist? That was the original platform of the Republican Party in the 19th Century.

Douglas' book I was thinking of about his travels in Iran is Strange Lands and Friendly People. A good read even if written almost 70 years ago. The one common trait he saw among all the different Iranian ethnicities was their warm hospitality.

Babak Makkinejad

Borg has no softpower left ehen it comes to Islamdom or to Russia. Borg cannot offer any positive vision of future to Muslims or to Russians - the failure of her goals and policies are therefore fore-ordained.

mike

Anna -

"all regular bridges have been destroyed by U.S. bombing"

The historic suspension bridge in Deir ez-Zor city was destroyed in 2013 long before the Coalition began airstrikes against Daesh in Syria. Some claim it was destroyed by jihadi shelling during a battle at the bridge, others say it was destroyed by fire from regime tanks.

The Siyasiyeh bridge (also known as the bridge of death) was destroyed by the Syrian regime in 2014 to restrict the movement of jihadi supplies and reinforcements.

The same Siyasiyeh bridge was attacked again, this time was totally destroyed in 2015 by the Russian Air Force. This was after the Daeshis had jury rigged a a crossing over the destriyed span.

Neither the US nor the Coalition struck bridges in or near Deir ez-Zor city. They did take out bridges near the Iraqi border to restrict Daesh from strengthening their forces in Iraq.

https://yallasouriya.wordpress.com/tag/deir-ezzor-bridge-destroyed/

https://www.thenational.ae/world/syrian-special-forces-destroy-strategically-vital-bridge-1.239502

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHK7Flpn38M

mike

Kooshy -

I never heard of Hess. And I generally stay away from CNN. But is that the same Freed that was touting globalization back before it became a buzz word? If so you should not trust a word he says.

I do think Putin would love to play the peacekeeper role in Iraqi Kurdistan. Delicately of course so as not to anger Iran and Turkey. That would enhance Russia's role as a superpower. And with ROSNEFT making money there he gets the best of both worlds.

Rescue

The Syrian Kurds are not Syrian, 90% of them are PKK fighters from Turkey. This is the reason that Turkey is against them, and Iran is worried as well.
Kurdistan cannot happen as long as Iran and Turkey still exist and both are opposed-- its as simple as that. The US has been trying to create a Kurdish state since the mid 80's.
The US plan so far has been to ensure friendship between Turkey and Iraqs Kurds, but this is now fracturing because of the referendum. Turkey controls the pipeline that allows the KRG to export oil to the international markets, if Turkey doesn't want Kurdish independence, they can end all prospects of it rather quickly, and there is nothing the US can do about it.
The statement by Major-general Golan was nothing more than a declaration of war against the four affected countries.

The Porkchop Express

Agree. But I think the Americans have also long harbored fantasies about helping the Kurds as well. The Kurds seem always stuck in a tight spot (real or imagined) and outside powers always seem more than willing to help them, but at least they're cognizant that any help always comes with strings and will likely not bear fruit on any future national Kurdish project.

And yes, the Kurds are a lot like the Kalash in Pakistan and the Nuris (Kafiris) in Afghanistan. Mountain folk and fiercely independent. Wide open spaces are not their "bag."

The Porkchop Express

Apologies, you did write "all westerners".

turcopolier

outthere

You and Mike admire Douglas because you share his politics. I do not. What we were bombing in Cambodia was NVA troops and installatopn in the jungle just across the border from VN. You object to that? pl

mike

Colonel -

I was never a fan of limiting US actions in Laos and Cambodia. The NVA was there in force using it as a safe area to build up supplies in between offensives. hy should the US and the RVN be limited in that respect?

I admire Douglas for his fight against the Wall Street banksters, his championing of the little guys standing up to the mega-corporations, his environmentalism, his love for mountains and mountaineer people. He was a avid mountaineer himself, not a technical with ropes and pitons, he just climbed peaks with a walking stick. If alive today he would have demanded we stop supporting Saudi campaigh against the Houthis; and US adventurism in Iraq and Syria. Too bad he is not still around.

'outthere' is right in describing him as a libertarian or maverick IMHO.

turcopolier

mike

I was in the croos-border recon business both tours and you are right. There were camps. depots and roads everywhere just across the fence. pl

mike

Rescue -

Syrian Kurds are as much Syrian citizens as the other diverse ethnic groups in Syria, including Arabs, Greeks, Armenians, Assyrians, Circassians, Mandeans, and Turkmen. Kurds are ten to 15 percent of Syria's population. Kurds have lived in Syria since before the crusades a thousand years ago. Long before my ancestors came to this country, and before the Ottoman Turks migrated into Anatolia.

Your statement that Syrian Kurds are PKK fighters from Turkey is bogus Erdogan propaganda.

I do agree with you about MajGen Golan.

ToivoS

I recall reading many years ago about the diplomatic discussions after WWI about how to divide up the Ottoman empire. One idea the French and British entertained was to create a Kurdish state. They gave up on that notion because the Kurds in Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria (today's maps) were fighting so violently among themselves that the colonialists felt there would be perpetual war if they tried to establish a Kurdish state. The Brits and French decided it would be simpler to establish an Hashemite Kingdom.

Maybe Israel can create that Kurdish state that the earlier colonists failed to do. Good luck with that!

YT

https://thesaker.is/chess-in-the-age-of-isis/

"Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes."

http://changingminds.org/disciplines/warfare/36_strategems/36_stratagems_24.htm

notlurking

You my friend get the prize.....

LeaNder

This will be fun to watch.

Not sure, IZ. Listen or read Golan's speech. Transcript is not perfect. Nitpicking ;) But, if he is controversial, why is he asked to write Israel's defense policy?

"No, it won’t be like the Second World War. It will be easier."

Its not anymore about fighting the poor, that's the big paradigm shift compared to the last 3 decades. Thus starting with the First Intifada? Now Iran is the at the center. Remnants of post 9/11 wisdom. State sponsors? Item: The 2011 Washington Assassination Plot?

http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/view/new-thinking-about-israeli-national-security-in-a-changing-regional-environ

LeaNder

That's a somehow odd statement from my perspective, kao. Looking at the larger history of Poland over the centuries. Not that I am a fan of the political trends in Poland today. But that may well be part of a larger trend. No expert on matters ...

turcopolier

outthere

Bombing enemy installations in the largely uninhabited jungle regions of Cambodia along the border with VN was an unexceptional operation of an ongoing war. There was no reason to have an "informed public debate" about it. Nixon correctly saw that in the context of an ongoing withdrawal of US forces from VN, your leftist friends in the media would create an issue that would deeply satisfy you. In that period our forces in VN grew steadily smaller and the bombing campaign in the border regions was necessary to disrupt enemy forces enough to protect our shrinking forces. But, you didn't/don't care about that do you? I can only know youby your statements. So far you sound like a standarts leftist agitprop type to me. Ron Paul? I have no interest in what Dr, Paul may have thought about combat operations. pl

LeaNder

via Al-Monitor, Ben Caspit, Israel Pulse:

http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/authors/ben-caspit.html

Strictly that's how I interpreted Golan's speech.

Klaus Weiß

Didn't Iran and Israel work together to support the Kurds in order to destabilize Saddam's regime? As far as I know this cooperation ended with the Treaties of Paris ...

Linda

The Isrealis started supporting the Kurds after the US started supporting the Kurds in 1991

turcopolier

LeaNder

Which Caspit article? pl

LeaNder

At the moment, Russia Insider seems to mirror Caspit's latest article. I suppose they paid the dues. Should I compare the content? Admittedly, I didn't. Simply followed the link.

http://russia-insider.com/en/politics/will-russia-tolerate-israeli-actions-syria/ri20891

mike

Oilman 2 –

You believe Thierry Meyssan??? The defamer of the Catholic Church, who denies 9/11, claims the CIA orchestrated the Chechen massacre of Russian schoolchildren, believes that CNN and BBC reporters tried to assassinate him in Libya. This nutjob propagandist lives in Damascus and writes for a Russian news service. I don’t know how they can stomach the garbage he publishes. A useful idiot I would guess. You need a better source for news on oilfields if you want to stay in the oil business.

sid_finster

Meanwhile...http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-13/bombshell-report-catches-pentagon-falsifying-paperwork-weapons-transfers-linked-orga

Assuming that the report is factual, the question is whether the DoD and CIA are simply ignoring the President?

Patrick H

Mike,

Obviously the Syrian Kurds are a substantial chunk of the population, & obviously they're not all PKK fighters from Turkey.

But if the broader point is that the YPG/PYD are closely integrated into the PKK, and ultimately under its leadership -- that's undeniably Erdogan propaganda, but probably not bogus. I haven't been to Rojava (I lived in Turkey for many years) but every reporter who goes there seems to be struck by the Abdullah Ocalan pictures on display everywhere

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