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14 November 2016

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LeaNder

Even the deconstructively inclined Erich Fromm

Interesting. What made you single out Erich Fromm? He cannot be called a bohemian after all.

I never reflected on the possibility of Erich Fromm being a deconstructionist. What specifically made him one?

I haven't checked First Things for a while, but:
ironic detachment, rejection of moral certainties and rebellion against cultural norms, as well as the new strategies of self-management that have replaced old-fashioned forms of self-discipline.

What are "the" moral certainties?

robt willmann

More news of concern regarding Trump advisers. Yesterday (14 November) Trump named former CIA director and neocon James Woolsey to be a "senior adviser". Woolsey was also involved in the Project for a New American Century--

https://www.donaldjtrump.com/press-releases/trump-campaign-announces-amb.-r.-james-woolsey-as-a-senior-advisor1

https://theintercept.com/2016/09/12/donald-trump-after-blasting-iraq-war-picks-top-iraq-hawk-as-security-adviser/

Notice that in the Trump statement, Woolsey describes himself thusly: "I have been a ‘Scoop Jackson,’ ‘Joe Lieberman,’ Democrat all of my adult life ...." Joe Lieberman? He was the U.S. Senator who, after he lost the Democratic primary for re-election, transformed himself into an "independent" under Connecticut law in 2006 and ran in the general election and won--

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/08/AR2006080800596.html

Lieberman was one of the leaders moving to reverse the appointment of Chas Freeman to head the National Intelligence Council in 2009.

The neocon approach is not going to abandon itself. Michael Ledeen got next to retired Gen. Michael Flynn as a co-author of the book published this year, "The Field of Fight: How We Can Win the Global War Against Radical Islam and Its Allies".

Radical Islam and "its allies"? I thought the issue was just "radical" Islam.

The Beaver

Thank you Colonel for clarifying this.

I thought that it was in relation to the businesses, so that the children don't deal with some non-welcoming foreign companies and/or govt.

LeaNder

sounded a bit staged to me. Although, maybe I indeed underestimate the fear factor.

turcopolier

Luther Blissett

Altogether an oversight on my part. Woolsey is at least as malevolent a figure as Bolton. pl

LG

Thank you for articulating so beautifully my inchoate thoughts on this subject.

Edward Amame

steve

From the WaPo's fact checker.

Paul Ryan’s false claim that ‘because of Obamacare, Medicare is going broke’

"...It has been a bipartisan fallacy to claim that the old-age health program Medicare is going 'broke,' which is incorrect for the reasons outlined below. But what was notable was he specifically blamed the Affordable Care Act for making Medicare go broke..."

Here's the link to the rest: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2016/11/14/paul-ryans-false-claim-that-because-of-obamacare-medicare-is-going-broke/?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_fact-checker-1225p%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

The Twisted Genius

pl,

Yes, I have a strong streak of Bernie Sanders Blue. (That ought to be a new Benjamin Moore color.) That's the small town NewEnglander in me. The motto on our town war monument reads, "The Noblest Motive is the Public Good." I grew up with that and it stuck. Plus, I haven't been mugged by the dreaded multi-culti yet. So far, I've had nothing but good experiences. It's the slackers of all persuasions that bug me.

Babak Makkinejad

Why is it that such malevolent people rise so high in the United States?

I mean, US has a very deep bench, why these people?

Do you know?

gnv377

Woolsey appointment: is it consistent with "keep your friends close and your enemies closer"?

turcopolier

babak

Sure. To reach the top in the jungle that is government you have to be massively egotistical and ruthless. Some of us are not that however much we might be more effective in our government work. pl

turcopolier

TTG

As you knew I supported Sanders in spite of the reluctance I have to accept some of his larger thoughts, but as I wrote I thought that he and Jane looked like something worthwhile. And that matters. You have not been bitten by the multi culti? Like me you are comfortably retired and protected by law from abandonment. The Deplorables are in a very different position. pl

Babak Makkinejad

In regards to the book:

"The Field of Fight: How We Can Win the Global War Against Radical Islam and Its Allies". "

So, somebody or somebodies find themselves in a religious war against Islam.

And I though I was the only one who was calling a spade a spade.

2 nominal Christians trying to adjudicate among the variegated ideas and ideals of Islam; I am not sure what to call it, "Hubris" or just plane "Madness".

Fred

LeaNder,

Are you trying to quoting something but are instead using italics? Ah, you have bamboozled yourself and are spitting out more gobbledygook. Thanks.

Babak Makkinejad

What is always like that?

I mean say in 1930s, 40s, 50s, of even 60s?

How Marshall get to where he was, for example.

dr. puck

pl the map at the precinct level shows us that there are supporters of the 'other' side just about everywhere. On my block in the most blue suburb (outside Cleveland) there were several Trump/Pence signs. Their votes were counted the same as a Trump vote in the reddest county in Ohio.

Without over-determining ideological affiliations on the ground, what the map seems to showcase are political facts correlated with population density. Correlations given by density eventually qualifies homogeneity and heterogeneity of a social entity. This should come as no surprise.

In 2008 I was searching via Google image search for precinct level maps having to do with the recently completed election and encountered what I was looking for, plus, a most revealing map that assessed where opposition to the Viet Nam War in 1970 was most intense. That 38 year old map of could have been overlaid upon the 2008 election map with out much area deviation.

These two maps reflected an unsurprising constancy and differentiation of social homogeneity and heterogeneity.

Fred

Origin,

Congratulations on avoiding any mention of "Crime" and correlation to blue voting patterns.

turcopolier

dr. puck

Your argument is basically that this election was a one off and that the Deplorables will soon subside into slovenly apathy and decline as a group. I am not sure that is true. I will tell you as I did TTG that what matters in these county sized districts is dominance. Your argument ignores the steadily growing power of the GOP at the state level. pl

Fred

Robert,

Sure do. I believe Colorado (along with other adjacent states) has enjoyed some explosive growth for a number of years as companies fled the tax burden imposed by the people's Republic of California. Texas and Florida are doing booming business in Americas fleeing high taxes in Blue states, especially in retirement.

jonst

well, he just gave, for all practical purposes, Cohen his walking papers! Three cheers for whoever pulled this off! And Rodgers too!

Origin

You make my point. The nation is a collection of individuals spread around and all mixed up. Every community has both mourners and celebrants in the election constantly lobbying each other about how we should govern ourselves. That diversity is magnificent!

dr. puck

I chuckled here. The dynamically self-created Trump is an unlikely tribune for restorative traditionalism.

Nevertheless the (to me) sketchy appropriation of the severe Evola, Guenon, by some of the masculinist thinkers of the alt-right, reminds me that the thoroughgoing metaphysical presumptions of traditionalism suppose that the ordained outcome of the conflict between what you term sane/normal with, (for lack of a better term,) secular relativism, is decided by absolute compliance to the revived old order, and where compliance is unobtainable, elimination of the opposition.

...exactly like what is on offer by the liver eaters. just sayin'

Babak Makkinejad

I very much like certain cities in Spain and Italy (not the Deep Spain or Deep Italy with which I have had no interaction). I like and enjoy aspects of the Italian and Hispano-American culture, cuisine, poetry, literature, music etc.

But I know that even if I could speak Italian or Spanish correctly, I would always remain a foreigner in those 2 countries. And I understand that, accept it, and do not have any issues with it; I would just be pleased that I could experience them and the splendid aspects of their culture and civilization - like when you can sit in the main square in Cuzco and just take in the flow of people, Spaniards, Andeans, and the Tourists.

The multiculturalism of this late phase of Western Diocletian culture reeks of condensation and of racialism; in my opinion. In Cuzco, the European or North American tourists are not there for what Cuzco offers, but for the ruins of a dead civilization that predates the Incas.

In Turkey, the nudist beach resorts for Germans is not an expression of Multiculturalism but rather colonialism

The Balts and the Finns of this world have been latecomers to the European culture and civilization. Yet in no place are their past accomplishments and culture (some dances, a few sagas and epics, some linguistic similarities with other languages) are explicitly mentioned or celebrated by the governments.

Likewise for Jews.

We have no "Jewish History Month", no "Balt History Month" etc. in the United States.

As you probably know, I consider my self "Beige", racially speaking.

I shudder to think a situation in which there would be a "Beige History Month" - I would find it personally insulting.

I would be very upset if "Beige" children were given a curriculum that did not cover all that has happened in Metaphysics since the time of Saint Bonaventure - under the excuse of trying to give them a taste of the accomplishments of their own past culture.

LeaNder

Ok, sorry, Fred. Didn't want to make you angry. But interesting, I did. The "price controls", I maybe should have paid more attention to that.

I responded to this by you:
"nor [am I] the author of the Talking Points Memo article that GCP linked to in the comment I responded to"

And then used italics instead of quotation marks for a maybe arbitrarily chosen quote by Josh Marshall [the author] or the article GolfCoastPirate linked to above. Not seriously reflected, babbling mode, while aware of Pat's complaints about the usage of quotation marks.

If it helps, I'll shut up for a while. Or simply keep out of purely American matters, if that could be some type of compromise.? ;)

Seriously no harm meant, only it feels complex matters. The baby boomers approaching retirement seem to be only one factor it seems... But what do I know?

http://paulryan.house.gov/issues/issue/?IssueID=9969

No opinion on this guy. No opinion about his use of the Annual Report to taxpayers too. Although it looks a bit simplified:

http://paulryan.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=398451

Origin


As for my support for the Constitutional structure, I think the Great Compromise of 1797 was a stroke of political genius. The result is that our presidential candidates must give attention to the smaller states and more rural areas. But for the compromise, all attention would be given to the densely populated areas during campaigns because the cost effectiveness of campaigning in the cities is so much higher. A candidate could generate more votes by visiting Atlanta with its four counties that exceed the population of at least four states at much less cost than canvassing in Montana, Wyoming, Alaska, and North Dakota. The compromise forces a broader attention to the less populated states by making each voter in those states have nearly three times the voter power of the larger areas. In my view, that is why the whole country is purple to varying degrees as pointed out by TTG instead being all the color of the largest states. This quirk of the American system is one of the major components of our political cohesion.

For those of you who may be unfamiliar with the Americans system, we select our presidents, not by direct election, but by a vote of a special body called the Electoral College that is elected by the popular vote within the states. Each state gets a vote for each senate seat and additional votes from each of its congressional districts. Nationwide, the congressional districts are based upon more or less equal amounts of voters. Georgia, my state, has 14 congressional districts and two Senators, hence 16 electoral college votes. Wyoming, our least populous state with only about 564,000 people, has one congressional district and two senators. Thus, a congressional district voter in Georgia has 1 + 1/14 vote value and a voter in Wyoming has a 1 + 2 = 3 vote value. This makes campaigning in the smaller states important in the economy of voting. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connecticut_Compromise

As for whether the men or women inherit the earth, that is for God to decide. However, families who teach their female children that they are able to be educated and compete equally and be equally ambitious and accomplished as their brothers, the well encouraged daughters’ sons (and daughters) will likely inherit more earth (real estate) and wealth than the ones from families who do not encourage their daughters and give them equal opportunity to excel as their brothers.

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