« Coup attempt in Turkey | Main | The "coup" was a fraud?" »

16 July 2016

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

The Twisted Genius

Tyler,

Good on you for keeping bees. They need all the help we can give them. For your artisan cheese, may I suggest this simple cheese that I always loved as a youth. We just sprinkled a little salt on it and ate it all the time... especially good with cabbage soup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcr5rYy7-Dc

Babak Makkinejad

Most life is boring.

MRW

Read some history, Peter in Toronto.

Can you handle 18 pages?

The Making of Humanity by Robert Briffault, 1919
https://archive.org/details/makingofhumanity00brifrich

Pages 184-202.

This stuff was known 100 years ago, at least among the educated classes who had access to the church and synagogue translations preserved from the Christian monk and Jewish scribe pilgrimages to Islamic Cordova starting in the 9th C.

MRW

Best days of summer were working with my grandfather who kept bees and had a “Honey Hut.” I turned the whirligig thingey he either invented or was standard that dripped the honey from the combs via centrifugal force into the bottles below.

Luxurious honey. Deep brown. The smell was out of this world. Grandpa raised bees and made honey for 40 years.

MRW

Apart from the glaring typos, this is a great post.

Karl Kolchack

It would greatly help your point about people not reading things carefully if you yourself would carefully edit what you write so that it isn't full of typos, misspellings and awkward phrasings. Something "butter," really? And the portion about Mohammed seemed like an irrelevant, wandering tangent that could have been excised and made into a whole separate post. Or maybe my problem is that I pay attention TOO closely.

Fred

Baback,

You need imagination.

Fred

Karl,

And here I was thinking "butter" wasn't a spat of dyslexia but Joyce in action. Artist as a Young Man and all that.

Henshaw

The Koran may contain known historical facts, but that doesn't make it history. Rather, it is the central feature of Islam's origin myth. In the couple of centuries after Mohammad's death, the new religion's authorities went to some effort to find and eliminate texts at odds with their own teachings- one of the reasons that there is so little early Islamic material available, in contrast to the wealth of material available from the early Christianity.

Most cultures and social entities have origin stories that legitimise their ancestral authority, origins, and relation to the cosmos. It's a historian's job to tease out the facts from the spin. There's an interesting new book on the last days of the Prophet, reviewed at http://www.al-fanarmedia.org/2016/06/a-new-perspective-on-the-last-days-of-the-prophet/ , an analysis by Hela Ouardi, a Tunisian scholar, unfortunately only available in French so far.

A key quote from the review is 'The “genius” of the first caliph, Abu Bakr, writes Ouardi, was “to have understood before anyone else that a hold on collective memory is the foundation of the exercise of power: controlling the Koran and the sayings of the Prophet will constitute, for centuries, a foolproof tool of domination and legitimation of authority.”

Sounds like an interesting read.

Richard Sale

Thanks for this.

Richard

Richard Sale

Thank you for the bees. Tolstoy kept them as well.

Richard

Richard Sale

I don't think life is boring. It is boring for those who settle in mediocrity, who have given up trying to learn and improve. To lack purpose, is to vow to be consumed with apathy.

Richard

Richard Sale

I apologize for the typos. I read through it three times, but something I get another idea or a phrase, and put it in and don't reread it for the fourth time.

I'll try to be better.

Richard

Richard Sale

The Gospels aren't history, either.

Abu Bakr was very corrupt, fashioning himself after Persian kings.

richard

Babak Makkinejad

The dearth of material is not due to any sinister actions; it is because the Arab culture, indeed the Middle Eastern culture, has been a very oral one.

Even the Sassanid Persia lacked, to any significant degree, a literary output comparable to the corpus of the your yard-stick, the Classical of Greco-Roman Civilization.

Babak Makkinejad

Arabs did not want Ali, and chose 3 successors in order to avoid Ali.

Every single of the 4 successors was assassinated.

Babak Makkinejad

Henshaw & Richard Sale:

A war has been raging for 60 years in Palestine because so many Jews and Christians believe in the existence of the Kingdoms of David and Solomon in there.

That after more than 100 years of digging no shred of physical evidence has been found to corroborate the existence of those kingdoms has not penetrated the consciousness of the Shoah Cultists and assorted fellow-travelers.


One picks a typical book on ancient Near East and the legends of Old Testament are treated as historical & archeological truth; which, at the same time, are being used to justify stealing Arabs' lands - both Christian and Muslim.

Rustam has more likelihood of having existed than Solonom and David.

Babak Makkinejad

I must have been wallowing in mediocrity for as many years - lacking purpose, consumed by apathy, and not knowing it.

"Against boredom, god themselves must take up arms."

Richard Sale

I realize I botched my own apology.

Richard

Richard Sale

I know.

Richard

Richard Sale

The legends of the Old Testament are ludicrous. There is no historical evidence that supports the Jews being enslaved by the Egyptians, for example.

Richard

MRW

;-) ✔✔✔ ;-)

How many times have I done that? And don’t start with me on what autocorrect does when I use my iPad. grrrr.

I'll try to be better. Let your wife have the last whack. Your articles deserve this over-attention because there’s a melody to your pieces that the words serve, and when they are missing, it’s jarring. Not many writers write for the ear.

Henshaw

Not ludicrous in the context in which they were written, and the audience they were directed to. An excellent discussion is Biblical scholar Thomas Thompson's book 'The Bible in History: how writers create a past'.

Evidence for the big claims like the twin Kingdoms and the Exodus is lacking, but there is enough 'truthiness' in the mention of places and activities etc to potentially make it persuasive to a fifth century BC reader.

Henshaw

I can't talk for today's children, but when I was growing up, the Old Testament/Gospels were part of the furniture, accepted as part of mainstream Australia's 1950s narrative, and not questioned. So when people came along making claims based on these widely accepted stories, they had a flying start.

Anyone arguing to the contrary had a major task, ie they first had to disabuse the audience of parts of its comfortable childhood recollections, which can be uncomfortable, and likely to encounter resistance- kind of like explaining that there's no Santa Claus.

MRW

See? html typo.

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Photo

December 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    
Blog powered by Typepad