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15 July 2016

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elaine

Colonel, 13 known attempts. The one with Johann George Elser may have
been in the "Valkyrie" film in the beginning & I forgot about it.

LeaNder

Try to understand our history in this context. Can you? It's not perception management, but has been growing for quite a while now. In a diffuse way mixing old and new.

ex-PFC Chuck

elaine, You can read the fascinating story of many of the plans for attempts on Hitler's life that didn't come close to fruition, and a few that did, in Mark Riebling's book <> In one instance the plotters were able to smuggle a time bomb aboard the plane that was taking Hitler back to Berlin from the eastern front but the timing mechanism malfunctioned and it didn’t go off. Conspirators at the German end of the flight had to scramble to remove it from the plane before it was discovered by the Gestapo. Most of the other attempts fizzled when Hitler’s plans changed or when people the plotters thought they had committed to doing something either chickened out or frustrated by circumstances beyond their control.

The conspirators were mostly Catholic lay people, but not entirely. A number of Catholic clerics at various levels of the hierarchy were involved as well as the Lutheran pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer and other Protestants. And, of course, Count Stauffenberg. The key figure in the plots described was a Munich lawyer who was a triple agent. (Unfortunately his name eludes me at the moment and since I read a library copy I don't have the book at hand.) Pope Pius XII was aware that a conspiracy was being coordinated by his minions, but according to the author to preserve ‘plausible deniability’ he was not informed of the specifics of the individual plots. However he must have known in his heart of hearts that there was indeed gambling at Rick’s place in Casablanca, so to speak. The pope took a lot of post-war heat about his failure to speak strongly against the Nazi regime. Riebling’s book makes a compelling case that the silence was necessary in order not to give the Gestapo reason to investigate the German Church even more thoroughly than they already were and this increase the likelihood of exposing the network. It finally came to light in the wake of the July 20, 1944, event. The lawyer was finally executed a few days before the end of the war, about the same time as Bonhoeffer was.
http://amzn.to/29ZJhM5

FB Ali

A detailed account of all the plots against Hitler is in the book by Joachim Fest. First published in Germany in 1994, it was later published in North America as "Plotting Hitler's Death".

Fred

Cee,

To quote or own President "Elections have consequences". Erdogan took that vote as one man, one vote, one time: He won. "Erdogan has removed the ... last hurdles on his way to absolute, supreme power"

"... a coup is never acceptable." you are wrong.

Fred

LeaNder,

"but has been growing for quite a while now" Yes the perception management has been going on a long, long time. You need the good immigrants/refugees. It's not like you will raise wages for that work "no one wants to do". Sound familiar?

JMH

Elaine, once the first set of conflicting reports came out in the news, the Valkyrie movie started replaying in my head. And, I have been "there" during a preemptive coup shake up, but nothing like this.

LeaNder

I may occasionally consider what you call anti-perception-management "spiritual arson" or incitement. It's a matter of perspectives.

I've been in the larger "perception management industry". To be quite honest, I occasionally preferred to do the type of jobs "no one wants to do" for my own inner well-being.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perception_management#Business

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