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04 March 2016

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Ishmael Zechariah

Slightly? This is completely off topic.
I am delighted with the infighting between the gulen and tayyip camps. It is an excellent show. Hope it gets worse.
I am also delighted by the discomfort Trump is causing the Borg.
Ishmael Zechariah

James Loughton

Trump supporters see him as the alternative to the Borg. They believe that the Borg has consistently ignored and abused the interest of American workers whom the Borg refers to as consumers.

BB

Agreed. It's either Trump or globalist interests controlling. It is astounding how globalist forces have marshaled all of their forces against Trump. They seem to release a Trump attack every 2 minutes from HuffPo to NRO. I love the armchair arbiters of etiquette and decorum condemning Trump's temperament, but my God, how is any man-- especially an alpha male-- expected to be unfairly attacked from a million directions and not lash out?? Frankly, I don't know how Trump has been able to withstand the onslaught and continue to be positive. Even in the debate it was multiple tag team attack against Trump. Trump is our last hope to head off the obliteration of America as we know it. If it's not Trump I will no longer feel obligated to give a sh*t about domestic or foreign issues. If a high-IQ'd billionaire with a dynamic personality can't bring people around, then I certainly can't make a difference. As a two-percenter in Massachusetts, with no kids, I have a lot less to lose than Middle American conservatives supporting Cruz because of his "principled conservatism". Good luck with that.

Kooshy

IMO, Obama was a phony, even a phony black, his health care is a BS and another phony, someone who couldn't afford to pay $600 per month before OC now with OC, still can't afford to pay $540.00 a month. That isn't a solution for small people, that is mandating everyone to pay insurance companies.

Grimgrin

More the contrasting themes of incipient apocalypse and quiet pathetic death between the two poems. The rhetoric around Trump is a little overheated, for a candidacy and potential presidency that seems likely to end in a rather mundane and miserable manner rather than a some terrible conflagration.

As for loving winners, maybe. On the other hand, Trump has been winning for a wile and the only big name he's had go over to his side is Christie who would probably look more at ease on stage if someone was pointing a literal gun at his head. There are republicans already talking up a third party run against him in the Presidential election. That they're even floating that trial ballon suggests it's unlikely the Republicans would fall in line behind Trump.

no one

Kooshy, Just so you can know, the insurance companies aren't getting anything out of O'care. They're all losing money on it b/c it was structured so that would obviously be the outcome. The big companies are pulling out of the O'care market. O'care is dead on arrival, just nobody has pronounced yet.

Lars

Here is the best take on the Trump problem that I have seen:

http://www.vox.com/2016/3/1/11127424/trump-authoritarianism

scott s.

I suspect many people viewed the candidacy of Jackson in the same way. These for the most part tried to cobble a fusion party with other factions, united chiefly by their dislike or distrust of Jackson, into a Whiggish party.

scott s.
.

rjj

I am seeing a lot of headline hyperbole about big Cruz win in Maine but few numbers.

Maine has a maverick voter problem (Perot and Paul did well here and then there is Gov. LePage). Republicans had a management strategy in place - fewer polling places -district rather than local. Dems vote locally tomorrow.

[all snips from different sources below line]
__________________________________

Maine Republican Party officials say 18,650 voters turn out, three times as many as in 2012, and give the Texas senator 12 of the state's 23 delegates.


"There are 22 [other sources say 20] locations set up for Saturday's event, and large crowds are expected."

"Rick Bennett, chair of the Maine Republican Party, said this year's caucus event will be a hybrid between a caucus and a primary.

Bennett said the change comes after the 2012 caucus was a "disaster" with straw polling and chaos when Ron Paul supporters disrupted the process.

Bennett said that won't happen again.

Political analysts said the hype will likely benefit presidential candidate Donald Trump.

"Politics is filled with unintended consequences that has wound up empowering Trump; the more places that Trump wins with a larger share than others, the more delegates he's able to amass because of the winner-take-most system," said Ron Schmidt, of the University of Southern Maine."

LeaNder

Fred, it was superfluous in this context, no doubt. I shouldn't have added it. Reminiscences of some of our earlier clashes ...

Tyler is right about this: "You really think Obamacare was anything more than a giant insurance giveaway?", of course. ...

I really did not take a closer look, thus have no idea to what extend it could have been, as Tyler seems to suggest, intended. It felt more like surrender to hyped up propaganda by special interests at the time. And yes, I read shocking personal tales from people in troubles and enormously high fees too, e.g. from one cancer patient.

robt willmann

This interesting photograph, usually in a cropped version, has started to appear some. Taken in July 2008 at a Joe Torre foundation golf benefit at the Trump National Golf Club in New York by a New York Daily News photographer, it shows, left to right, Rudy Giuliani, Donald Trump, Michael Bloomberg, Bill Clinton, Joe Torre, and comedian Billy Crystal--

http://www.gettyimages.com/search/photographer?excludenudity=true&family=editorial&page=1&phrase=clinton%20trump%20giuliani%20golf&photographer=new%20york%20daily%20news%20archive&sort=best

No outsiders there.

Tonight, 5 March, Trump gave a press conference of sorts in West Palm Beach, Florida. You could not hear the questions asked, but the subject of waterboarding came up. Trump backtracked completely from his earlier bombast that not only was he going to do waterboarding, but more than that (meaning torture), and also his debate statement that the military will obey his orders in that regard. He actually acknowledged that there are laws and regulations that are supposed to be followed, and he said he would follow them, but that he wants to get those laws "extended", meaning, changed. Maybe his sister called him up (she is on the federal Third Circuit Court of Appeals).

LeaNder

From "the domestic front" to "recognizing ... problems" while having "no solutions" it feels to me, there may be something much bigger ahead over here too.

I am trying to wrap my head around a critique of neo-liberalism, its genesis and its application in Russia post 1989 at the moment. With a focus on law having to serve the economy.

To not go all the way back to Modernist "poememes": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLV4_xaYynY

Recall the support for a health care reform here. A nurse surfaces on my mind. But I doubt that Tyler supported it then. Am I wrong? I cannot at this point in time imagine, he would support anything that originates in the "wrong camp".

"(note: I am not white, but someone actually told me that to my face seemingly obliviously. I was quite amused, to say the least.)"

I am pleased about that. Nutshell: I didn't like the idea of a gravestone marked with "Sic Semper Africanus" for "Saint Trayvon of the Skittles"; but I respect his personal experience may have left traces, if I recall correctly the dead of his sister ... if true.

Valissa

Yawn... "authoritarianism" and "fascism" are very common labels for Trump used by many liberals/Democrats. Every 4 years the left brings out those labels for Republican candidates. Typical liberal propaganda. Dog whistle politics at it's finest. No real thinking required. Meanwhile strong denial about how authoritarian the Democratic party has become. Both parties are run by their elites in an authoritarian fashion, ignoring and/or propagandizing their grass roots (into hating the "other") as much as possible. At least the little people of the Republican party are attempting to fight back.

Is Trump really any more authoritarian than Hillary? Or Obama, with all his czars and signing statements and prosecution of whistle blowers?

LeaNder

I thought, you may be delighted, although I sure wish I did grasp it as well as you do. Irony Alert: First the military, now the Islamic competition lots of conspiracies against poor Tayyip.

Over here Millî Görüş was the main topic in the post 9/11 universe. But it faded from attention and the news by now. I wasn't aware of the gulen tayyip struggle before reading your comments.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mill%C3%AE_G%C3%B6r%C3%BC%C5%9F

Yes, off topic, but why not misuse Richard's comment section, while you are around. Hoping he forgives me. ;)

Brunswick

You need to visit DKos, and other Dem sites.

The infighting between the Dem camps has become brutal and vicious, to the point that Kos is bringing in the "ban hammer" on the BernieBro's, ( 58% of his site, but none of the "Front Pagers", on March 15th, when his site will be All Hillary, All the Time.

William R. Cumming

Question for the pollsters! For all!

Please rank the candidates of all parties on probable ballots in descending order of all as to whom you as a voter will never vote for as President?

IMO Trump and HRC may be the first choice but for very different reasons.

And why is Ross Perot not discussed as adversely impacting voters for Bush [in 1992] and Dole [in 1996]? Am I wrong?

Fred82

For me, it is quite simple.

Trump is the best realistic option being offered in 2016. I won't vote for HRC, am not enamored by Cruz, and Webb is off the table.

Stephanie

As you say, the Federalists gave as good as they got:

"... the profound and fearless patriot and full-blooded Yankee, [who] exceeded in every possible respect his competitor, Tom Jefferson, for the Presidency, who, to make the best of him, was nothing but a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father, as was well known in the neighborhood where he was raised, wholly on hoe-cake (made of course-ground Southern corn), bacon, and hominy, with an occasional change of fricasseed bullfrog, for which abominable reptiles he had acquired a taste during his residence among the French in Paris, to whom there could be no question he would sell his country at the first offer made to him cash down, should he be elected to fill the Presidential chair..."

Damn that Southern corn.

However, the Founding Fathers had more than enough political virtues to compensate for their political vices. Mr. Sales' central point is surely correct.

Valissa

That's typical behavior for those sites. Once upon a time I hung out at those sites when Bush was prez thinking that they would be part of the much needed "political change." Hahahahaha... boy did I learn my lesson. I remember 2007 it was OK to discuss all the Dem candidates (there were 6 or 7 of them IIRC), and then as 2008 came along and the heavy campaign season and fewer and fewer of the candidates were acceptable to talk about. Until finally came the big rift between the Hillary supporters and the Obama supporters, when many people left DKos and started their own political blogs. It had finally stopped being OK to support Hillary at all and it was only Obama all the time. I haven't been back to Dkos since early 2008 when I left in disgust at all the tribal bullshit and increasingly obvious propaganda, but I can see the same games are still going on. I guess all the reasons why Hillary was so bad, bad, bad in 2008 are no longer true and history was been rewritten.

Now that I am an avowed nonpartisan and realist, and no longer participate in non-rational partisan discussions about politics, I am a much happier person.

rjj

and Nader.

Swampy

Try this:

http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2016/02/28/the-lion-and-the-sheep/

"If Trump gets the Republican nomination the neocons are through as a viable political force on the Right. That’s why National Review devoted a whole issue of their magazine to the theme “Against Trump.” That’s why the neocons’ allies in the media are going after him hammer and tongs. That’s why neocons like Robert Kagan are openly declaring they will support Hillary Clinton, while others – including the formerly libertarian network of organizations funded by Charles and David Koch – are financing a “Stop Trump” campaign. There is even talk of the (impractical) idea of running a third party candidate in order to take votes away from Trump."

ex-PFC Chuck

Au contraire, the rebellion of the progressives is very significant, and pose just as much of a threat to the party, and maybe even more so, than the Trump phenomenon does to the GOP. The reason is that the Democratic Party’s nomenklatura (federal and state elected officials, senior paid party operatives, wealthy donor/activists, etc) and its volunteer activists (caucus & convention goers, door knockers, phone bank folks, etc.) either aren’t aware of the depth of the disaffection among their grass roots supporters or don’t give a damn. The grass roots tacitly showed their disgust in 2010 when they didn’t bother to show up to vote in the off-year elections enabling the GOP to take over both houses of Congress and many state houses. If Sanders is perceived to have been denied the nomination because of a tilted playing field I expect many of his supporters to either voter with their butts on the couch again or cross over for Trump. Hilary, on the other hand, will probably get crossover votes in the other direction from various flavors of disaffected Republicans.

ex-PFC Chuck

My favorite example of electoral campaign invective from that era is from John Randolph, IIRC, although I don’t recall what he was running for. “My opponent is very competent but utterly corrupt. Thus, like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight he both shines and stinks.”

Lars

The point is that authoritarian regimes never end well. Not that I believe Mr. Trump will ever get to implement any policies, but he will be followed by others with the same inclination. We may even see an re-enactment of the 1852 election.

Tyler

Lars,

These are the same people who support Obama when he decides who to kill via robot sky assassin over his Monday morning corn flakes.

"Vox.com" lmao. Hopefully Emperor Trump executes the entire staff of that fishwrap by making them do deadlifts until their hamstrings explode.

Up your game Lars.

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