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17 August 2015

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Gatun Lake

Very much looking forward to the Memoir and thank you for your blog!

LeaNder

Explain, will you?

LeaNder

Love it, based on Pat's explanation below.

among us readers. ;)

take care, TTG

turcopolier

All

http://www.music.army.mil/music/buglecalls/tattoo.asp

This link will take you to the US Army official music site where if you press the download button, a bugle will play "Tattoo" for you. if my choice of this title is mysterious - Good! pl

William R. Cumming

P.L.! No data to provide but hoping the role of former Union and Confederate soldiers post WBS in Egypt will be woven into the fabric of your books[s]!

MartinJ

Colonel

I was married to an Egyptian woman for a time. Her great great grandfather was a man called Muhammed Raouf Pasha. She still shares his family name "Raouf" and a descendent of his married Sadat.

Raouf Pasha was of mixed heritage, a Circassian with an Ethiopian mother that gave him a "swarthy" look. He was captured by pirates and then entered the service of the Ottoman army as a young boy. He rose to become a senior general in Khedieve Isma'il's army.

He was variously the governor of Luxor, the governor of Crete, of Sudan (1973 - 74), of Harar in Ethiopia (1875) and various other places.

He invaded and annexed Harar on behalf of the Kedeive.

In 1877 he was field marshall in charge of the Ottoman army in Bosnia.

It was his inept attempt to subdue the Mahdi in Sudan that directly led to the Mahdi's rising as a military force that would sweep the Turks (sic) out of Sudan. He was at that time a slaver, and thus an affront to Charles Gordon who succeeded him as governor. He was a drinker and famous for his skill at the baccarat table.

He enjoyed establishing public gardens and zoos. He established Cairo zoo and the zoo in Khartoum as well as the public gardens in Chania in Crete, where he was governor for a time.

One of his last (infamous) actions was as prosecutor at the trial of Ahmed Orabi Pasha.

He has a bust in Cairo citadel.

I traced out his family tree on paper and had a record of all the various wives and daughters' names but its somewhere in storage in England. I shall try and get you some of the names.

Churchill had this to say:

After his resignation of the post of governor-general, Raouf Pasha, an official of the ordinary type, who, as already mentioned, had been dismissed by Gordon for misgovernment in 1878, was appointed to succeed him. As Raouf was instructed to increase the receipts and diminish the expenditure, the system of government naturally reverted to the old methods, which Gordon had endeavoured to improve. The fact that justice and firmness were succeeded by injustice and weakness tended naturally to the outbreak of revolt, and unfortunately there was a leader ready to head a rebellion, one Mahommed Ahmed, already known for some years as a holy man, who was insulted by an Egyptian official, and retiring with some followers to the island of Abba on the White Nile, proclaimed himself as the mahdi, a successor of the prophet. Raouf endeavoured to take him prisoner but without success, and the revolt spread rapidly. Raouf was recalled, and succeeded by Abdel Kader Pasha, a much stronger governor, who had some success, but whose forces were quite insufficient to cope with the rebels.

LeaNder

suddenly, it feels you mentioned this before. Meaning, I should have recalled.

It is listed under Wikipedia's disambiguation entry for tattoo.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattoo_%28bugle_call%29

taken from here:

http://www.music.army.mil/music/buglecalls/tattoo.asp

thanks, Pat. Repetition may work. ;)

LeaNder

oops, wasn't that far yet. ;)

Johnny Reims

Please give Gen. Loring and all his colleagues, North and South, my best regards. JR

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