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29 June 2015

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The Twisted Genius

optimax,

That occurred to me as well, especially after seeing Roof taken down so gently. No knee on the back of the neck and a Happy Meal on the way to the police station.

Fred

Col.,

“What we have here is a failure to communicate.” I know that’s sooo Louisianaish but just just when did escaping from prison become a crime punishable by death? What immediate threat did that man pose, while running away? Now just what happened to all those calls in NY for police body cameras? I guess that’s just for them Southern police forces.

How did these guys escape and who helped them. (That ought to embarrass the unionized work force, the warden and the Governor) Well let’s ask the escapees. Um, oh yeah, ones dead. Not to worry, we’ll find out who knew what about that breakout because the other escapee is talking - under medication? Why how convenient! Right to a lawyer, like when you are in the hospital all doped up recovering from gun shots? Nah, that’s so Louisianaish. Maybe New York State could use a branch of the ACLU?

Governor Cuomo must be proud. Now when he goes to de Blasio’s town and can raise that fist in the air and say, “No peace, No Justice”. Uhm, maybe not literally since that sure is what happened. But the real “communicating” here? - Why we shot down those white savages like they deserved! Black Lives Matter! Left unsaid, of course, is what about that oath he took to defend the Constitution? Doesn’t that apply to felons? African Americans might want to know since there are plenty of them in prison, but apparently not this one. I wonder why? Surely we’ll soon get to the bottom of this though as the FBI is on the case! It sure should be easy with a middle aged white lady as fall gal and a white felon face down in a pool of his own blood. You know he ain’t talking and she sure remembers what happened to Serpico. And there’s not even a Confederate battle flag in sight.

Richard Armstrong

I know that we're frequently told what a dangerous profession law enforcement is. It's actually slightly less deadly than firefighting but the difference is really statistically insignificant.

As much as officer friendly (to quote Tyler) might feel threatened in a situation the odds are incredibly not in favor of his dying at the hands of a suspect.

Over the past 24 years an average of 64 LEOs died at the hands of a criminal annually.

Given over 1 million LEOs on the U.S. that's just about 0.0064%.

64/1,000,000 are pretty good odds. (Stats from the FBI)

What jobs are more likely to kill you in the line of duty?

Supervisors, Proprietors, Carpenters, Cashiers, Groundskeepers and Gardeners, Welders, Roofers and Auto Mechanics. (Stats from BLS.gov)

Think about it. Maybe if we stopped telling cops how dangerous their job is they wouldn't feel so compelled to use deadly force.

(Cue Samuel Clemens quote in 3......2......1)

confusedponderer

"The photo is a bit similar to the posed stills from the wild west "posse got their man" genre. Also reminds me of posed shots from a safari; Bwana and lead trackers with the downed wildebeast. I don't think they were administering first aid, just getting their 15 minutes worth."

My thoughts exactly.

"As far as the media goes, two different morality plays for two different situations and, in this case, another gladiator eaten by lions. Are you not entertained?"

Excellently put.

confusedponderer

Yup.

confusedponderer

"I wouldn't underestimate the toll that three weeks of this manhunt had on this community and its LEOs. The Trooper in question, if nothing else, ended what must have been a really anxious time in search area."

That's a weird argument. I'm all for sympathy for and empathy with cops, knowing a few myself, but what does stress matter as far as the standards of conduct is concerned?

If they had a rough time of late, what otherwise impermissible conduct becomes permissible? Beatings? 'Nickel rides'? 'Enhanced interrogation techniques'? Extrajudicial killings? That's what that type of reasoning usually aims on justifying.

The cops may habe been justified in shooting this escaped convict. I cannot judge that. I'm a little put off by what eerily looks like a trophy shot though.

Fact is that police in the US is prone to treat suspects harshly, with often lethal consequences for those at the receiving end, deserved or not.

That these incidents are exploited for political gain should IMO not obscure the fact that there IS a problem with excessive force used by police against citizens. The worst such case I have heard of late is this one:

" A judge today acquitted a white Cleveland police officer in the 2012 shooting deaths of an unarmed black couple, saying he couldn't determine whether the officer alone fired the fatal shots at the end of a 137-bullet barrage.

Michael Brelo was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter and a lesser charge of felonious assault in the shooting deaths of Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams. He was visibly emotional as Cuyahoga County Judge John O'Donnell read a portion of his verdict in open court.

Prosecutors said Brelo, 31, was one of 13 officers who fired 137 times into the couple's car in the November 2012 shooting. The 22-mile, high-speed chase through Cleveland began when an officer tried pulling over Russell for a turn signal violation. His car backfired while speeding away, causing officers to think someone in the car had fired a gun.

Thirteen officers fired upon the car at the end of the chase, including Brelo, who prosecutors said stood on the car's hood when it was stopped and shot 15 times into the windshield. He told the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation that he thought he and his partner were being shot at.

No gun was ever found in the car. Russell and Williams were each shot more than 20 times."

http://abcnews.go.com/US/verdict-reach-trial-cleveland-police-officer-accused-2012/story?id=31252998

That line is the most remarkable: 'couldn't determine whether the officer alone fired the fatal shots at the end of a 137-bullet barrage' Apparently, the two folks were just goo after that, and sifting through all that minced meat one couldn't possibly determine forensically who really did the kill?

If thirteen suspects, say from a gang, had fired at two officers shooting every officer more than twenty times, the matter that the court couldn't determine just who of those thirteen did the kill would very probably be immaterial to their being convicted for the killings in a bundle.

BabelFish

I think you have this right on point, Nick.

On first aid, it was always respiration, circulation. Make sure they can breath, make sure they have a pulse, make sure they don't bleed out. All of that was to the extent possible with the supplies and help on hand. We usually tried not to move patients unless one of the above was threatened and then you did what you had to do.

J

Colonel,

There is no longer a peace officer mentality in our beloved nation, it's all about 'enforcement' in all its broadest and most ugly contexts. Especially since 911, 'enforcement' has drowned out any remaining peace officer thought.

All are 'supposed to' have the protections and benefits of our Constitution and Bill of Rights. From the most pristen to the lowest scum sucker, justice is supposed to be blind equality in its application.

It hurts writing and thinking about today's sad state of affairs.

Tyler

Nick,

I like to think I send people to urban dictionary and obscure philosophy websites in equal measure.

Tyler

Sir,

Yeah, not a fan of the deer trophy style pose either. Bad form.

Tyler

RA,

That's funny Richard, because 124 LEOs were killed in 2014, which is nearly double the number you quoted and a 24% increase from last year. Those stats also don't take into account things like permanent injury from doing your job. Guy I work with nearly got his head caved in by an "undocumented" immigrant who used a rock on him. Still can't see out of his left eye and nearly died from it (Me and my buddy happened to be cross trained as EMTs and were able to keep him alive until the medevac got there).

But hey, what's playing fast and loose with the facts about dead cops compared to a jolt of moral superiority, m i rite?

nick  b

Tyler,

I often don't agree with what you say, but there's no denying that I enjoy the way you say it.

nick  b

CP,

I understand what you are saying, and I don't disagree. Yet I think this situation is vastly different that what you have described.

Unlike the case you cite in Cleveland, the escapees in NY were a known quantity. The Police knew who they were looking for, their guilt was not in question, and that they were capable of murder was not in question. The stress felt was not only by law enforcement, but also and perhaps more acutely, by the local community who were essentially under siege. I believe this must have played a part in how Trooper Cook conducted himself, and his decision to fire upon Sweat. He was dealing with known quantities, he did not shoot first and ask questions later.

I should add for context that in rural parts of NYS there are often no local Police departments. Law enforcement is provided by NYS Troopers. It is likely that Trooper Cook was a local LEO and lived in the community.

shepherd

Col. Lang and no one,

16 years ago I was being driven to the airport by a friend who worked in movie promotion. He was trying to help market an unusual film set in Rome. Knowing my academic background, he asked if I knew anyone who could read Latin. We turned the car around...

Oddly enough, I remember that the shooting script was unimpressive. That scene (You knew Marcus Aurelius) seemed forced and repetitive to me, and I am astonished at how strong it is in the film.

And not that it matters, but I think you mean "Roma Invicta."

turcopolier

shepherd

Thanks. One grows old. My contention on the script is that the general is dead throughout. pl

BostonB

Three listed LEO "in the line of duty" deaths in 2015 were attributed to 9/11-related causes. Eleven due to heart attacks. I was looking for a category for "Eve eating the apple-related".

Where else can someone retire in his or her mid-forties, on disability (i.e., tax-free) with a six-figure pension? In 2011 the Boston Globe listed ten Boston PD officers who made over $200k the previous year. I'm sure it's probably over $300k these days.

Look at this NYPD gem who retired with a $135k (tax-free) pension: http://nypost.com/2014/09/08/a-retired-cops-shocking-life-of-drugs-booze-and-crime/

Tyler

BostonB,

Annnd what? 9/11 meso/injuries aren't a thing? You're trying to DISQUALIFY here.

Oh bless my stars every person in the profession isn't a saint. No kidding, sherlock. Some hard hitting investigation there.

Tyler

Nick,

One of my favorite compliments here is "he knows exactly where to place the rhetorical knife".

shepherd

Col. Lang,

I don't think anyone making the movie saw it that way, but that would be the only way it would make sense in a Roman context.

turcopolier

rick

Do you feel the same way about Southerners who store guns in their hunting cabins? pl

nick b

Col.,

"North-Country" is a local name for the northernmost counties of New York State. I don't think rick meant it as a north/south comparison.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Country_(New_York)

turcopolier

nick b

He may not have but I do. pl

BostonB

Here's another gem. A former sergeant with the Fairfax VA Police Department. Muhammad Rasool tipped off another member in his mosque who was being investigated by the FBI. Sgt. Rasool, who was born in Afghanistan, tipped off a fellow radical Muslim associate of Anwar Awlaki after searching is the NCIC federal database. Even though Rasool compromised a federal investigation and the suspect got away, he got a slap on the wrist. And later got a good fed job with the IRS which requires a clearance. Nice.

http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials/030714-692562-why-does-irs-have-al-qaida-spy-working-for-it-.htm

Tyler

BostonB,

The fruits of worshipping at the altar of Diversity and letting your frontal lobes shut down whenever someone says "Multiculturalism".

turcopolier

rick

So, he and Sweat broke into a hunting cabin and stole weapons. That is to be expected. I lost a Mossberg 500 shotgun that way once out in Shenandoah County . I expect it was my handyman who faked the break in because he wanted it. I reported the loss to the sheriff and it went into a national missing gun register but it never turned up. people in the country live so close to guns that I doubt that they secure weapons to the satisfaction of city people. North or South it is probably the same. pl

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