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09 January 2015

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Cee

All,

I posted earlier, no problem. The Beast used to be the largest computer in the world. Now?

shepherd

I believe it goes by many names. Donerdog, Donertier, Hundgefutter. It is a stuffed animal made in the shape of shawarma on a spit.

ex-PFC Chuck

As you may recall I had a problem getting my comment to post a few days ago on the Atlantic/Fallows thread and after several tries over the course of over an hour finally emailed it to you directly, which you kindly put up yourself. Everything appeared to work fine until I hit the "Post" icon; then nothing. I haven't had the opportunity to try a post since until now. And now, to the "Post" button.

ex-PFC Chuck

Hello again. Whereas the "Post" button worked fine on my post here a few minutes ago, which like this one is what you might call a top-level comment, just a few minutes ago I attempted to submit a response in reply to a previous comment by Babak Makkinejad. I Suspected it wouldn't work as soon as I saw the "Post" and "Preview" buttons, which were faded. Sure enough, nothing happened. Inferring from this experience it appears that the problem pertains to responses to top-level posts only.

turcopolier

All I have opened a "ticket" with typepad on this. pl

turcopolier

All

It is also called a Shawarmadon. It is still to be found in the ME where it is hunted for its succulent flesh. pl

euclidcreek

Looks like a cousin of the Corn Dog.

confusedponderer

Yes, definitely a Dönertier.

Nowadays a pretty common sight even here up north, since it has been brought to Germany for its succulent flesh.

confusedponderer

Oh, and no problems posting here.

shepherd

In case you guys are never tried it, the Lebanese brought this method of cooking to Mexico, where it was transformed into one of my favorite tacos. It's usually known as al pastor. There's a taco truck In New Haven that does it as well as anybody.

ex-PFC Chuck

It may be significant to the Typepad people that I'm using the Firefox browser, version 34.0.

oofda

Est is ein Dönertier. The animal that provides the meat for the Dönerkebab in Germany and Austria.

Haralambos

A post of mine got swallowed two days ago and has not appeared. I imagined it might have been my error. It might have been my fault after all. I do not like to shift the blame unless I am certain that I have the technology right. The typepad folks have rejected my email address several times as I have tried to post this. I will try a new email address if this continues.

turcopolier

Typepad HTML Email


Maybe I cancelled it.

Haralambos

With all due respect, was there a reason or was it in any way offensive?

turcopolier

Haralambos

I don't remember. maybe it just got lost. pl

Fred

Col.,

Is there a 'cooked goose' version of Shawarmadon? See below about the slowly roasting and hopefully soon to be indicted David Petraeus:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/01/09/david-petraeus-paula-broadwell/21524905/

Ishmael Zechariah

Col. Lang, SST

For those interested in the donertier: Here is a link to an article on gyros vs. shawarma vs. döner-kebab:
https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-difference-between-gyros-shawarma-d%C3%B6ner-kebab

They all taste reasonable, but different.

Ishmael Zechariah

confusedponderer

Well, there is Hühnchendöner, which comes from a subspecies of the Dönertier, and its succulent flesh indeed tastes like chicken. It's somewhat fatter than ordinary Dönertier though. I don't see that in Petraeus.

To my dismay some forgeries have been discovered, in which demented vegans have made things visually resembling Dönertier carcassess. I am apppalled. If these nuts want to eat döner, they should get over their guilt, go for it, and not kid themselves by faking it.

confusedponderer

IZ,
there are some streets in my town where you can test all of that just by going door to door.

Usually I prefer shawarma over döner over gyros, largely because with döner (lamb, calf or chicken) and gyros (pork, then inevitably with tsatsiki garlic sauce) the portions tend to be gargantuan. Oftentimes I can do well without half a pound of meat. When I eat döner I prefer Lamb döner

Chicken döner is ok, but tends to be greasier and you will, when you eat it standing, quickly learn the 'Döner stance'.

With "Döner" as served in Germany then you have the essential question of how you serve it - and the variations are myriad.

Berlin inventor of the Döner Kadir Nurman suggests only bread (usually a quarter pide) and meat, while it is more common to serve it with salad and tomatoes, often with different sauces. IMO many of the sauces just smother the taste of the rest. Variations would be to have Döner in Dürüm or lamancun instead of pide. Another variant is to have it with fries, and in real Turkish restaurants they serve it with rice and various vegetables (highly recommended).

Even better than Döner is IMO Adana Kebab which is köfte (spiced minced meat) wrapped around flat skewers and roasted over coal fires. Variations as above, and you tend to get it in restaurants as opposed to an imbiss.

Personally, I like best just lamancun with some salad, tomatoes and just lemon juice. A turkish baker told me that they are eaten that way back in Gaziantep.

Ishmael Zechariah

CP,

Since I am from Adana I do agree with your statement "Even better than Döner is IMO Adana Kebab". However, gustibus nil disputandum est.

The proper way of having Lahmacun (from Arabic: bread-with-meat) is to put a bit of chopped up tomatoes/onions/usw. on it, squeeze some lemon juice (from a real lemon) on all, roll it up into a wrap and then eat. All of southeastern Turkey uses this MO. How else do folks go about eating it?

Ishmael Zechariah

confusedponderer

Ah well, most commonly tsatziki (spill over from Gyros) or 'hot sauce' (joghurt and chili). When it gets weird - remoulade, mayonnaise and things like that.

IMO all of that is overkill for the chopped up vegetables. Lemon jouce underlines the taste of the chopped up tomatoes/onions/etc. It's better that way.

I thank the Turkish baker who opened my eyes on the subject. I was slightly buzzed that night and so delighted about the taste of the lahmacun that I ate some greater quantity and kept praising the food, and the cook, enthusiastically and at some length, until my friends pretty much dragged me away because it was really getting late. Carnival.

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