« A great arrogance revealed to all. | Main | "US commander in Afghanistan says he is "mad as hell"" Heraldsun »

30 September 2012

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

YT

Ah, Col.

Your Erin Brokovich moment, I presume?

JMH

Plutocrats are relentless; it's nice to know that there are still upper middle class pockets of resistance such as Old Town that still remain. The big boys would love to take the place over, but they don't want to live in the attached small dwellings of our beloved shire. Mcmansions in Mclean for them. Let it be so.

turcopolier

YT

Nothing as vulgar as that. pl

turcopolier

JMH

Old Town (the district by the river) is not as significant a part of "the resistance" as it once was. Opposition to the "plutocrats" is quite active and general in most of Alexandria. pl

turcopolier

YT

This "moment" started in 1950 and the struggle over land use and building acceptability has been continuous since then. pl

Fred

That's a coalition of the willing I can support! GenOn is a wholesale power generator,they don't care about the local community at all, only the bottom line. Given a $2.53 share price that's not so hot since the financial collapse. I wonder how much they were involved in Cheney's still secret energy policy task force?

John Minnerath

Congratulations for success in the long fought battle. Sometimes the people win.
Here in Wyoming we suffer a plague of gigantic coal fired plants. The so called "mine mouth" variety, built right at the coal source.
The major percentage of their electricity being exported to power hungry cities beyond our state.
While for home consumption we rely on older, more expensive, smaller plants.

YT

Aye, sir.

One of the unfortunate things 'bout Corporate America....

Bobo

Ugly is always in the eye of the beholder. The shutting in of coal fired plants is a no brainer today with the low natural gas prices. But ten years from today that may not be the case as the other big polluter in the area (the one with a white dome) is furiously writing bills to allow the export of natural gas via LNG liquification facilities. With world prices presently 4 to 1 over US prices the export of natural gas will even that up over time putting King Coal back as the fuel of choice.

Thus per the above I can only urge the good citizens of Old Town not to rush the gentrification of their waterfront as power plants will always be needed. Possibly a few dozen windmills, some solar panels, bio massing of the old coal pits and a new paint job on the old plant may help.

I know, I'm whistling in the wind.

Michael

Viva los insurgentos!!

Some developers in Gwinnett County, GA are trying a similar end-around with property they bought around a taxpayer-funded stadium. The developer is seeking a zoning change from commercial/hotel development (that they intended 4 years ago) to high density single dwelling housing with zero lot lines. Thankfully, the County Commission is not letting the developers off the particularly barbed hook of their own making.

Jose

I normally do not like to meddle in other people's affairs, but look at what Toronto did with their old power plant:

http://www.thepowerplant.org/

If you could connect all those parks you could do something really nice:

http://www.waterfrontoronto.ca/

That is one beautiful city, wish our politicians were not cheaper by the dozen. LMAO

Best of luck!!!!

turcopolier

Jose

To hell with that! This thing will be flattened. I can hardly wait. Toronto can do what it wants. We don't want Ferris wheels and casinos in Alexandria. pl

turcopolier

bobo. Nah! Ugly is ugly is ugly. We don't have economic problems in this town. We don't have unemployment problems. None of the electricity from this plant EVER came to Virginia. It was a colonialist power plant that sent all its product to that cess pool across the river while spewing its poison in our air. Washington needs the electricity? Much of the city of Washington is a blighted slum. Dynamite, bulldozers and 10 ton dump trucks will clear a space for the new plant. Better yet put it beyond the horizon in Maryland. It is a joke that the Chamber of Commerce here is continuously whining about "discouraged developers" in Alexandria. I have spies in city hall. The developers are fighting each other for a chance to meet our standards. pl

confusedponderer

Good riddance to that monstrosity. Looks aside, it was 63 years old? I bet there have been precious few modernisations in that period - after all every emission filter is a cut into the dividends of shareholders and the bonus of a CEO.

Unless you force companies to do that, by public pressure and/or (enforced) legislation, they won't invest in such things. I don't know about the Dems, but certainly in the Republican party, there are precious few politicos who look at landscape and nature not with them as a cultural goods in mind, but who are merely seeing their market value. Witness the modern day barbarians.

Some time back I moved out of my old flat, and I had an excess table and an excess built-in cooker. The table was just a simple grey kitchen table, like the one that my grandmother has had. I didn't need it any more - there just was no space for it in my new flat. It had worked splendidly, to the extent tables do, for thirty years and, by the looks of it, it would do for another thirty. The cooker was still ok but 'long in the tooth' and also something I didn't need. I took both out on the street. I wanted to load them on a truck that I had rented to move it to a collection centre. I went back into my flat for a few minutes because there was something else that I had to take care of.

When I returned scavengers had been at the scene. Where they came from, I don't know, and how they came so fast I don't know either. One of them obviously had been out for the scrap metal. He wanted the cooker. In order to get it he had smashed the table to use one the legs as a club. With the table leg he then had broken out the cooker. It couldn't have taken him much longer than two minutes. He left me with the trashed remains and hurried away with his prize on his bike, to sell it for a couple Euros. I could see him driving away when I returned.

I was, and am still, furious at the needless waste and wanton destruction. The scavenger must obviously have been poor, but more importantly, to me he was a bloody barbarian.

Many CEO's are not better in any way. They only happen to have more money and a better educations. They may wear pinstripes, but, by mentality, they are barbarians all the same. IMO Mitt Romney is such a barbarian.

The Twisted Genius

Good riddance indeed. I worked in Alexandria for ten years, including several on the waterfront practically in the shadow of that monstrosity. I always thought it was PEPCO's way of saying screw you to our side of the Potomac. I took the train from Quantico to the Alexandria Station every morning. In addition to witnessing some beautiful sunrises over the Potomac, I always passed the Possum Point Power Plant just north of Quantico. At least that plant converted from coal to natural gas and oil in 2003... and its power goes to Virginia

Alba Etie

Col Lang
"Think globally act locally " .

turcopolier

Alba Etie

That is kind of a local tradition. This town is filled with worldly people who are not easily intimidated by bureaucrats and businessmen. Lots and lots of lawyers and senior federal government officials. pl

Alba Etie

Col Lang
As is Austin, Texas and the surrounding Hill Country . I sent you an email off line - re veteran employment , did you see it yet ?

Alba Etie

Air pollution does have a cost associated with it as well .
We may recall once upon the conservative GOP valued clean air . President Richard Nixon started the EPA .

Michael Moore

Col. Lang,

Why did she oppose the apartments at the Metro station (besides the developer being an asshole)? That's the best place to put dense, mixed-use development.

Best,
Michael Moore

turcopolier

michael moore

Because we don't want to live in an ugly city. If we listened to people who want to put maximum density next to subway stations we would live in a very ugly city, a place you would not want to live in. Well, maybe you would... pl

Michael Moore

Col. Lang,

Actually, I do want to live in an "ugly" city. A nice vibrant place where I can walk everywhere and don't need to drive to do every little chore and errand. BTW, I'm not a car-hater. I like having a car for road trips, etc.

Another question: why on earth did they build the subway out into what is apparently the suburbs? That sounds like a terrible ROI.

Best,
Michael

turcopolier

Michael Moore

Your description of your dream home is very like central Alexandria, except that it is beautiful and we are going to keep it that way. Metrorail is a system built to bring suburban commuters to Washington, D.C. pl

Michael Moore

Col. Lang,

I've never been to central Alexandria, but it sounds nice. But Metrorail sounds like an at grade commuter rail system -- I thought it was described as a subway in your original post? That's a bit different, although I still maintain that it makes sense to allow denser development around stations like that. The additional riders help pay for the system (and takes some of the burden off the taxpayer).

Best,
Michael

turcopolier

michael moore

Metrorail runs below ground in the central parts of the system but above ground farther out as in alexandria. the system extends well beyond Alexandria as it does across the river. Metrorail has no shortage of passengers and runs at a profit. WMATA as a whole runs in the red because the bus system that is part of WMATA runs heavily in the red because of "featherbedding" that is politically enforced by the transportation unions centered in Washington, DC. pl

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Photo

February 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Blog powered by Typepad