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23 April 2007

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canuck

Thanks for the laugh. But the video is based on a fallacy because there is no tech support to call when you're reading a book unless you include a librarian.

John Hammer

I thought it was a terminator eyeball, must be a generational thing.

Charles

Too funny. But I see some problems. What if the candle goes out? Is there an alternative peripheral or backup? Is it available in one of those independently powered hand crank models?

Charles

Also, does it work in daylight, or do resolution limits require that it be operated in a dark environment?

Charles

What about system requirements? Will I have to do an expensive upgrade to make it work? How many candlepower does my system need? Can I run it on top of my lap? Do I need a password?
Does it come with parental control options?

confusedponderer

Isn't that HAL's 'eye' from 2001?

Got A Watch

Looks like my eyes on Sunday morning after a hard weekend.

Brian Forester

The Apple iRack
http://www.glumbert.com/media/irack

Annie Burns

Not relevant but clever....


The Demographics of American Newspapers:
1. The Wall Street Journal is read by the people who run the country.

2. The Washington Post is read by people who think they run the country.

3. The New York Times is read by people who think they should run the country and who are very good at crossword puzzles.

4. USA Today is read by people who think they ought to run the country but don't really understand The New York Times. They do, however, like their statistics shown in pie charts.

5. The Los Angeles Times is read by people who wouldn't mind running the country -- if they could find the time -- and if they didn't have to leave Southern California to do it.

6. The Boston Globe is read by people whose parents used to run the country and did a far superior job of it, thank you very much.

7. The New York Daily News is read by people who aren't too sure who's running the country and don't really care as long as they can get a seat on the train.

8. The New York Post is read by people who don't care who's running the country as long as they do something really scandalous, preferably while intoxicated.

9. The Miami Herald is read by people who are running another country but need the baseball scores.

10. The San Francisco Chronicle is read by people who aren't sure there is a country . . or that anyone is running it; but if so, they oppose all that they stand for. There are occasional exceptions if the leaders are handicapped minority feminist atheist dwarfs who also happen to be illegal aliens from any other country or galaxy, provided of course, that they are not Republicans.

11. The National Enquirer is read by people trapped in line at the grocery store.

12. The Oregonian is read by people who have recently caught a fish and need something in which to wrap it.

Jim Schmidt

This skit is great. I've been doing "IT" for, ..wait for it.., 29 yrs. That was back when a floppy drive wasn't a medical condition. IT then was a procedural humdrum but nowadays is considered a class act. (Little inside IT humor). So, as an "IT veteran" (IUP,VAR,MAP with multiple clusters), I feel qualified to comment on the issue raised.

Regarding the problem experienced by our "book user", our daily one to many interactions lead, logically, to IT categorizing support issues into Pareto graphs of decending importance. Root cause analysis reveals that the majority of issues belong to a common collection of problems, known, by referance, as ID 10-T errors.

In this instantiation, our "book user" has committed a very obvious ID 10-T error.

ID 10-T errors are the primary cause of "user" dissatisfaction nationwide, perhaps, worldwide. However, while the magnitude of ID 10-ts are well know within the professional IT community, little is known in the "real" world due to suppression and distortion of the facts by the large monied interests controlling the major media outlets.

Unfortunately, ID 10-T errors are easily inherited from an extended class of methods and properties associated with the human namespace, and exhibit wide and reckless variation due to random mutations resulting from deviant polymorphism.

I'll leave it to others to describe what deviant polymorphism involves, but, suffice to say, the practice is broadband and widely distributed.

Fortunately, modern error event handlers are commonly employed by the IT community to prevent overflow into protected areas, so ID 10-Ts remain chronic, but not virulent.

So, kick back, push the stack and fetch a few cold processor cycles. The Professional IT community has it handled.

Jim Schmidt

Col,

Note: I obviously need a hobby. However, please consider just one more revision.

-------------------

This skit is great. I've been doing "IT" for 25+ yrs. That makes me 1A and vulnerable to a cold draft. And, I thought I was F'd when I counted my first 15.

I started in IT back when a floppy drive wasn't a medical condition. IT then was a procedural humdrum but nowadays is considered a class act. (Little inside IT humor).
So, as a seasoned component veteran (IUP,VAR,VAD and MAP with multiple clusters), I feel qualified to comment on the “user” issue parodied in the skit.

Regarding the problem experienced by our "book user", our daily one to many interactions lead, logically, to the categorization of support issues into Pareto graphs of descending importance. Root cause analysis reveals that the majority of issues belong to a common collection of problems, passed by reference, as ID 10-T errors.

In this instantiation, our "book user" has committed a very obvious ID 10-T error.

ID 10-T errors are the primary cause of "user" dissatisfaction nationwide, perhaps, worldwide. However, while the magnitude of ID 10-ts are well know within the professional IT community, little is known in the "real" world due to suppression and distortion of the facts by the large monied interests controlling the major media outlets. As to why these tiddly-winks would do something so sinister, who knows, probably something to do with big oil.

Unfortunately, ID 10-T errors are easily inherited from a large class of methods and properties associated with the human namespace, and exhibit wide and reckless variation due to random extensions resulting from deviant polymorphism.

I'll leave it to others to describe what deviant polymorphism involves, but, suffice to say, the practice is broadband, widely distributed and legal in Utah.

Fortunately, modern error event handlers are commonly employed by the IT community to prevent overflow into protected areas, so ID 10-Ts remain malevolent, but not virulent.

So, kick back, push the stack and fetch a few cold processor cycles while you enjoy the view through the window. Let the professionals worry about crossing the t’s and dotting the nets. The message is queued: the IT community has it handled.

Adrian

I worked in IT support for about 8 years and love this video, thanks for reminding of it :)

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