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October 18, 2012

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JFF

I recognize a Beistle fireplace screen in that first photo, am I correct? The photos of the youngsters take me back to when I wore a Lone Ranger costume every year until it shredded. Thanks for this nostalgic post, Maureen.

Maureen Lang

JFF,

Yes that's a Beistle- good eye! Here are some more of the Beistle company's wonderful Halloween firescreen designs from the early part of the 20th century (all repros at this link; originals are rare/fragile/pricey as with most paper-based Halloween ephemera):

http://www.halloweenlanterns.com/page4.html

Glad you enjoyed the post. I especially recommend the classical music links- very nice for generating a pre-Halloween mood around the house.

JFF

I did listen to your play list, Maureen and I liked it very much. I would also include Edvard Grieg's In the Hall of the Mountain King on the Halloween classics list.

Maureen Lang

JFF,

Glad you liked listening to the play list selections. Here's a youtube of Grieg's "Hall of the Mountain King" for your further listening pleasure:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrIYT-MrVaI


Natalie

What a nice Halloween post; lots of great information and pictures. Halloween is the best - thanks for posting about it!!

Maureen Lang

You're very welcome, Dr. Nat, & thanks for taking time out from the clinic schedule to send in a comment.

Kiwi

Wonderful antiques, Mo. Will you be doing your charity yard haunt once again this year? Since we all moved to Avila I do miss the kids goggling at your front yard. No one does anything like it up here. Keep up your good spirits on Halloween night.

Maureen Lang

Kiwi,

Yes, we are once again doing a "Cans for Candy" Halloween yard haunt. Our front yard will be filled with spooky characters, big bowls of candy, & a donation bin for the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. It's a great way to celebrate Halloween (as you well know, old friend) & enjoy a visit with our neighbors, friends, & their children.

Bobby Murray

This is wonderful Maureen, thank you.

Maureen Lang

Thanks, Bobby. Good to see you're back commenting on SST & TA. Hope you & yours have a Happy Halloween.

David

A very nice post, thank you. Wishing everyone a Happy Halloween.
David

par4

Not to much poetry appeals to me but that one is pretty darn good. Thanks Maureen

smoke

What a wonderful Halloween collection!

One can't help noting that Halloween falls midway between an equinox and the winter solstice, as does Ground Hog's Day, 3 mos later. Similarly, May Day falls midway between spring equinox and summer solstice. The one marker of the solar path, which seems to have disappeared entirely from contemporary calendars, would be a holiday near August 1. Suggests ancient roots, old timekeepers.

Maureen Lang

smoke,

The contemporary incarnation of pagans known as Neo-Pagans (aka Wiccans) seems to have that August 1 holiday in their calendar. Found this on http://www.witchway.net/days/days.html:

"LUGHNASSADH (August 1)
The great corn ritual of Wiccan belief (in Celtic realms this is the celebration of the wheat god, corn is an Americanization and it is possible there is an American Indian traditional holiday near this date that was borrowed by the American Neopagans). This is the big celebration of the harvest (Sort of a Pagan Thanksgiving, but the time clock is different as is that of the Celtics). Much feasting and dancing occur, though it is a bit more somber than many of the other holidays. Some Pagans celebrate this day as mearly the day to bake their bread and cakes for the coming winter and do no actual rituals save that of blessing the foods prepared. Pagans see this as a time when the God loses his strength as the Sun rises farther south each day and the nights grow longer. The Goddess watches in sorrow and joy as she realizes the the God is dying yet lives on inside her as her child. As summer passes, Wiccans remember its warmth and bounty in the food we eat. This sabbat is also called Lammas, August Eve, Feast of Bread..."

Shirley Bolton

Lovely Halloween post, Maureen. Robert and I enjoyed it so much we put it up on our biggest screen to show to our grandbabies. That would be Steffy's two daughters. A very Happy Halloween to you.

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